Bethany Denton | KNKX

Bethany Denton

Sound Effect Producer
Momka Peeva / Momka's Glass

This story originally aired on October 27, 2018.   

Bulgarian-born Momka Peeva knows a thing or two about glass. In fact, she probably knows everything there is to know about all kinds of glass. She even wrote a book about it, which is still the go-to text on glass composition and manufacturing used in Bulgaria today.

 

This story originally aired on October 20, 2018.

Growing up in Taiwan, Dean Huang always knew he wanted to study abroad, especially after visiting cousins that had immigrated to Boston. “It’s just that Taiwan is really small, and I feel like I can maximize my potential and challenge myself to receive a different education.”

 

This story originally aired on October 20, 2018.

Nightmares happen to us all. For people with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, nightmares can be debilitating, nightly experiences. “Trauma nightmares are almost [like playing] a video tape of a traumatic event,” says Dr. Murray Raskind. He’s a psychiatrist at the VA Puget Sound hospital in Seattle and a professor in the University of Washington School of Medicine, who’s been researching PTSD treatment since he started working with a support group for African American veterans of the Vietnam War, in 1994.

 

Tommy Tang / Tommy Tang Films

What do gelatin, a wrestling ring, and feminism all have in common? Jello Underground. An all-female run jello wrestling tournament. Part performance, part competition, part declaration of female power and sex positivity.

Penny Reagan shares a photo of her and her late husband Ricky.
Bethany Denton

This story originally aired on June 22, 2019. 

Jon McCollum (AKA Jon Boy) and Penny Reagan (AKA Momma Penny) have the kind of unlikely friendship that only a hectic kitchen job could foster. They worked together for food services at the University of Washington, and they hit it off right away.

Walla Walla Community college students Eric McAlvey, front, and Kevin Bayna, rear, show their support for the scheduled hanging of child-killer Westley Allan Dodd, Jan 4, 1993.
Mason Marsh / The Associated Press

In the fall of 1989, in Vancouver, Washington, a short, 29-year-old man named Westley Allan Dodd raped and murdered three young boys. The boys were brothers Cole and William Neer, ages 10 and 11, and 4-year-old Lee Iseli.

A few weeks later, police arrested Westley at a movie theater after he tried and failed to abduct another boy. He quickly confessed to the three murders. The prosecution sought the death penalty, and Dodd pled guilty.

Thierry Ehrmann via Flickr

 

It all started when CeCe Moore decided to make a family tree as a wedding gift for her niece. At that point she’d had a whole career in entertainment, working as a model and television and musical theatre actress. But once she started digging into her family history, CeCe quickly realized that she couldn’t put it down.

 

“It just started as a hobby, but once I saw the potential of it, I kind of dropped everything else I was doing,” she said.

Gabriel Spitzer / KNKX

This story originally aired on September 8, 2018.

Sara Jamshidi grew up in Iran before the 1979 Islamic Revolution. She remembers when her mother could wear sunglasses and mini-skirts on hot summer days, before the new fundamentalist government made laws about what women could and could not wear.

 

Paul Elliot / Creative Commons license https://bit.ly/1iowB8m

There’s a debate going on in American higher education about trigger warnings and safe spaces, orthodox thinking and free speech. Evergreen State College in Olympia became briefly famous in that debate in May 2017, when a discussion about campus equity spiraled into a true crisis, involving protests, counter-protests, death threats and neo-Nazis. Graduation had to be moved off campus because of safety concerns.

Bethany Denton / KNKX

 


“A volunteer-run, bicycle-based, 365-night-a-year street outreach program with basic emergency supplies and syringe exchange and naloxone distribution…. In Olympia, Washington.” That’s how volunteer Cassie Burke describes the Emma Goldman Youth and Homeless Outreach Project, or EGYHOP.

Gabriel Spitzer

Koleka Furlett can’t even count the number of times she’s tested her math trick on a chalkboard with numbers ranging in the millions and billions. It’s a trick she came up with in the third grade when she was first learning her multiplication tables. Koleka noticed a pattern when multiplying numbers by five that made for a handy shortcut. Basically, whatever number you want to multiply by 5, divide it in half and stick a 0 on the end. (For example, 16 x 5. Half of 16 is 8, then stick a 0 on the end.