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Barrett and Audrey Stowe with their parents, Courtney and James. Barrett interviewed Audrey and two friends about what advice they'd give themselves if they could travel back in time to before the pandemic.
Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

Take the Mic: If you could time travel to before the pandemic, what would you tell yourself?

Imagine you could step into a time machine and travel back to a year ago. What would you tell yourself now that you’ve experienced life in a pandemic? Seventeen-year-old Barrett Stowe, who attends Tacoma School of the Arts, asked two friends and his sister that question. It turns out the upheaval of the past six months has led to some realizations about what’s important to them in life. Barrett produced his own radio story, with guidance from KNKX staff, as part of our Take the Mic youth voices project.

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Diane Schuur
Tim Courtney

Pianist and singer Diane Schuur began her career as a pre-teen in the Seattle-Tacoma area and was soon performing at a Holiday Inn. She became a regular at jam sessions in the area and attended the University of Puget Sound. Discovered and encouraged by Doc Severinson, Stan Getz, Don Grusin and others she was soon appearing at major festivals and recording regularly for GRP for whom she made 11 albums plus two collections. She has also recorded with Ray Charles, Maynard Ferguson and the Count Basie Orchestra.

Noah Fortson / NPR

President Donald Trump is announcing his nominee to replace Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on Sept. 18. Watch the announcement live.

A new distillery will soon begin making whiskey, vodka and gin on Chehalis tribal land in southwest Washington state. It's the first legal, Native-owned distillery to open on tribal land in the nation. The Chehalis Tribe's effort to diversify its economy by joining the craft spirits boom had to first overcome a nearly two century old prohibition on liquor production in Indian Country.

Adrian Florez / KNKX

September is National Suicide Prevention Month, and leaders from Native community health and wellness organizations came together this week to discuss strength, resilience and healing. 

Abigail Echo-Hawk is director of the Urban Indian Health Institute, a research division of the Seattle Indian Health Board. During the public panel Thursday, she said it’s important for Native communities to have access to resources for healing.

In this 2015 file photo, protesters demand release of the orca whale some call Lolita, who has been in captivity at the Miami Seaquarium for 50 years.
Wilfredo Lee / The Associated Press (file)

Fifty years ago this week, the killer whale some call Lolita arrived at Miami Seaquarium. She was captured at Penn Cove, in the waters off Whidbey Island, in early August 1970, along with dozens of other young orcas.

Sold for about $20,000, she arrived in Miami on Sept. 23, where she received her stage name and has lived ever since, in an 80-by-35-foot tank. Originally named Tokitae by her trainers, she is the last surviving Southern Resident orca in captivity.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being remembered in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol, where she will lie in state in Statuary Hall. Watch the ceremony.

Stephen Brashear / The Associated Press

Some Seattle sports teams were impacted this week by COVID-19 testing and protocols, put in place by their leagues. KNKX sports commentator Art Thiel and Morning Edition host Kirsten Kendrick talked about the fallout, starting with a mask fine that cost the Seahawks $250,000 and head coach Pete Carroll $100,000.


In this photo taken Tuesday, June 16, 2020, Cirio Hernandez Hernandez moves a ladder as he works to thin honey crisp apples in an orchard in Yakima, Wash. The coronavirus pandemic is hitting Latino communities especially hard.
Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press (file)

The Latino population in Washington state is just 13 percent of the population, and this group of people accounts for more than 40 percent of COVID-19 cases. By contrast, white residents make up 68 percent of the population, but account for only 39 percent of confirmed COVID-19 cases.

Now, Latino doctors and community leaders are trying to understand why this is the case. 

Photograph by Koichi Miyagami

I learned early in my radio career, there aren't enough hours in the day to hear all the new music. So, listening to fellow listeners can be tremendously helpful. It was an email from a New Cool fan that introduced me to Toconoma, and I'm delighted to share them with you.

The Associated Press (file)

Wash your hands, wear a mask, stay socially distant — and get a flu shot. This is the message health officials are preaching as we head into cooler months when we’ll all be spending more time indoors.

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Transmission is a podcast about life at the heart of the COVID-19 epidemic in the Pacific Northwest.
A podcast about homelessness aimed to help you understand one of the most complicated issues facing the region.

Featured Studio Session

Nate Wood of Kneebody.
Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

Kneebody gets comfortable in the KNKX studios

Having just flown in that day from Vancouver, the four men of Kneebody settled into the KNKX studios to briefly catch their breath and play a few songs. Their new album Chapters comes out Oct. 18, and their world tour is kicking into gear.

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Featured Jazz Northwest

Amber French

Recent Releases By Northwest Artists On Jazz Northwest

A sampling of new and recent releases by resident Northwest musicians is featured on Jazz Northwest this week. One of the most unusual is Recording Ban by Jacob Zimmerman. The title refers to the musicians' union strike against the recording companies 1942-1944. The Recording Ban occurred at a time when jazz was evolving from Swing to Bop and as a result some significant music was not played in recording studios during those years. Jacob Zimmerman zeroed in on that period for his debut...

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