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Seen a wolf? Report it on state's new website

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This Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife photo shows OR-11, a male pup from the Walla Walla pack, waking up from anesthesia after being fitted with a radio tracking collar in northeastern Oregon.

OLYMPIA, Wash. — People who think they've seen a wolf, heard one howl or found other evidence of wolves in Washington have a new place to share their story.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has created a website for anyone to report a potential wolf sighting. The agency's Donny Martorello says the information will help wildlife managers document wolf activity and manage the species.

Wolves have been migrating to Washington from Idaho, Oregon and British Columbia. Five wolf packs have been documented in the state, all in Eastern Washington.

Martorello says state wildlife managers will use citizen reports to help locate new wolf packs and pups during the spring and summer and capture and fit wolves with radio collars to monitor their movements.

Bellamy Pailthorp covers the environment beat for KNKX, where she has worked since 1999. From 2000-2012, she covered the business and labor beat. Bellamy has a deep interest in Indigenous affairs and the Salish Sea. She has a masters in journalism from Columbia University.
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