Sound Effect | KNKX

Sound Effect

Saturdays at 10 AM

Sound Effect is stories inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by KNKX's Gabriel Spitzer. Each week's show explores a different theme.

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Schuyler Bogue

 

This story originally aired on January 6, 2018.  

It wasn’t so long ago that, in order to buy groceries, most people would walk into a market, hand their list over to a man behind a counter, who would then go back into the store room and get everything for them. There were generally no prices listed -- it cost what it cost. You rarely got much say over what brand you got. That was the way it was, and it was hard to imagine it working any differently.

 

This story originally aired on January 6, 2018.  

People will go to great lengths in pursuit of wealth. Mountains will be literally moved in order to make them release the mineral bounty they contain. This is the drive that led to the creation of Monte Cristo, a mining town founded in the North Cascades back in the late 1800s.

 

Today, Monte Cristo is a ghost town. Yet, it still has a hold on people like David Cameron.

 

By Howard Giske, CC BY-SA 3.0

This story originally aired on January 6, 2018.

The first openly-operated gay bar in Seattle was a nightclub called Shelly’s Leg. It was founded in Pioneer Square in 1973 by a woman named Shelly Bauman. It quickly became an important center of LGBT life in Seattle.

But it's the bar's origin story -- and the freak parade accident at the heart of it -- that caught our attention.

This story originally aired on January 6, 2018.  

Everybody loves a good mystery ... some of us more than others. So when Tom DesLongchamp discovered an unusual looking cassette tape in a bargain bin, and discovered a collection of unidentifiable disco songs on one side of it, his curiosity was aroused. That curiosity soon transformed into a fixation, or maybe even an obsession. 

Michael Pollack/Flickr

This show originally aired on January 6, 2018 

Craig Gass does an uncanny Tracy Morgan. He can do Adam Sandler and Christopher Walken with the best of them, and there’s a good chance his breathless Mark Wahlberg would fool the actor’s own mother. Listen to them now above.

Jennifer Wing / KNKX

Lauren Davis and Ricky Garcia met when they were teenagers working together at a preschool in Issaquah. They formed a strong and close bond, as young people often do. That bond was destined to change the course of their lives. It also changed the possibilities for other Washington state residents who are struggling with addiction.

In this June 28, 2016 file photo, members of the Rainbow Family of Living Light gather under a tarp at their campsite in Mount Tabor, Vermont.
Wilson Ring / AP file

A woman from a conservative background decides to leave that world and join the Rainbow Family. Then, a woman becomes excommunicated from her family for marrying outside of her religion. Also, a woman reunites with her daycare caretaker, but this time in a completely different type of environment.

Courtesy Mary McIntyre

Mary McIntyre was rasied in Bellevue in a conservative Christian home, and attended a conservative Christian school. There was no shortage of rules and expectations. While Mary loved her family, something was always telling her when she was growing up that this wasn't exactly the life for her.

Matthias Roberts

 


Matthias Roberts came out to his parents at age 15, and at the time both he and they hoped this would be a temporary challenge. Matthias and his family were conservative, Evangelical Christians, and they believed that homosexuality was a sin to be overcome.

How a daycare worker became one woman's other mother

Dec 8, 2018
courtesy of Marisa Comeau-Kerege

Her name is Gulshan Yunis. But I call her Ammi — Urdu for "mother."

When I was growing up, both my parents worked full-time, so they needed someone to take care of me during the day. Like a lot of parents, they looked hard for the right person. In the end — and this is a family joke now — I chose Gulshan.

Jennifer Wing

 


In 1956, Rita Zawaideh's parents made the decision to move the family to the United States so that their children would have a better education. They left their large extended, Roman Catholic family behind in Jordan. They eventually settled in Seattle, where Zawaideh lives today.

 

In this story, Zawaideh talks about the difficult consequences of making choices when she was a young woman that her family did not agree with and about the love that came from an unexpected community.

 

CC0 Creative Commons

We head to Scarecrow Video, where competing against streaming media is a matter of survival. An over-50 women’s champion basketball team finds that losing can be more sweet than winning. Then the story of a man who ran Wyatt Earp out of town, shot the chief of police, and then went straight. Finally, the cutthroat world of pumpkin-growing competitions.

Steve Albertson

 

Meet the two teams:  

Seattle NABA is the local branch of the National Adult Baseball Association. When they’re not suited up, they’re tech workers and bartenders and consultants. At least one is a retiree.

The San Quentin A’s, in their green-and-gold uniforms, are all inmates at San Quentin prison in California. And it was on their turf that the two teams met for a recent four-game series.

By Thomas R. Conlon - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0

So, just in case you haven’t spent a lot of time in the Seattle of the late 1800s, I can tell you it was a very different city.

courtesy of Port Townsend Drizzle

For three years running, from 2015 to 2017, the Port Townsend Drizzle took home the gold medal in the over-50 women's division at the Washington State Senior Games.

It's an impressive feat for a group of women without much basketball experience. It would be even more impressive if they'd had anyone to play against.

Paul Elliot / Creative Commons license https://bit.ly/1iowB8m

There’s a debate going on in American higher education about trigger warnings and safe spaces, orthodox thinking and free speech. Evergreen State College in Olympia became briefly famous in that debate in May 2017, when a discussion about campus equity spiraled into a true crisis, involving protests, counter-protests, death threats and neo-Nazis. Graduation had to be moved off campus because of safety concerns.

Credit Parker Miles Blohm

It's our annual Thanksgiving week tradition, when we share our favorite music stories from the past year. 

Courtesy of Jason Webley and Chicken John

This story originally aired on May 26, 2018.

On a hot, windy night in San Francisco, a good friend of Everett musician Jason Webley climbed into a dumpster. His nickname was Chicken John, and he crouched at the bottom of the dumpster to light a cigarette. What he found, there among the garbage, turned out to be unexpected treasure: an oversized, handmade leather scrapbook that was falling apart.

The music of Prince brings two people together in an unlikely way

Nov 24, 2018
Courtesy Leah Tousignant

This story originally aired on September 2, 2017.

Robbie Luna is a man of many hats, a Seattle area carpenter by day, and by night he fronts two bands, one of which is a Prince cover band called "Purple Mane." With Prince's 2016 death the band suddenly found 

Credit Melissa Bird

 

This story originally aired on October 21, 2017.

Andre Sanabria discovered at 21 he had a deadly disease, and the only cure was a double-lung transplant.

But that did not stop him from making music. In fact, he says music is what was keeping him alive.

Jennifer Wing / KNKX

 

 This story originally aired on October 21, 2017

It’s hard to imagine a time when karaoke did not exist in the Northwest. Today, any night of the week, you can go out with friends and find some place where you can belt out your favorite tunes in front of a crowd.

 

But, everything has a beginning. Things have to start somewhere, right? For American style karaoke in the Northwest, it was at Bush Garden in Seattle’s International District.

 

Credit Parker Miles Blohm

This story originally aired on May 26, 2018.

Naomi Wachira was born and raised in Kenya, studied broadcasting in Chicago, then theology in Seattle. While she always had an impressive singing voice -- she sang in choirs since she was five -- becoming a professional musician wasn’t truly on the radar until 2013, after her father, a pastor in Kenya, passed away.

Gabriel Spitzer

 


Melba Ayco is the Artistic and Program Director for Northwest Tap Connection. The studio, located on Rainier Avenue in South Seattle, teaches children how to dance. Most of the students are African American. Along with learning how to shuffle and do a time step, Northwest Tap students get a lot of exposure to social justice issues, thanks in large part to Melba. 

KNKX

We meet a woman who combines tap dancing with social justice. A pediatric oncologist shares his story of being pulled out of his comfort zone. And a woman talks about how she chose to shout her diagnosis from the rooftops, only to find out later that she was misdiagnosed.

Courtesy of Tim Haywood.

 


One thing that hardly anyone warns you about when you have kids is how much time you will spend worrying about them. From the moment they enter the world until, well, as long as you are alive, you worry — about everything.

 

Courtesy of Sam Blackman

 


Sam Blackman was about a year into his career as a pediatric oncologist, when he got a page on Friday afternoon. It was from a doctor at the Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital across the street.

 

In her early 20s, Ginny McClure got some bad news. It was the kind of news people tend to be embarrassed to share. Ginny resolved to not be ashamed — to shout it from the rooftops, even.

Still, there are certain subjects you don’t really want to talk about with certain people, like your parents. For Ginny, that subject was sex.

Courtesy of Alex Hubbard


    

If you’ve spent any time walking around Seattle neighborhoods, you’ve probably spotted a “Fantasy A” poster bearing the name and image of a young African-American man.

 

His handmade fliers promote performances at local clubs and bars where he shares details about his life through rap music. He spends about six hours each day putting up posters.

 

“I’m a musician with autism and I write songs about my personal struggles,” Fantasy A said.

 

Will James / KNKX

 


The Merkle Hotel is a vestige — one of the last residential hotels in Western Washington geared toward housing low-income people. These hotels were once commonplace in this region, particularly in Seattle and Tacoma, but also in many other towns with sizable populations of transient and/or immigrant workers.

 

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