Jennifer Wing | KNKX

Jennifer Wing

Sound Effect Producer

Jennifer Wing is a Producer for our weekly show, Sound Effect.

She believes that everyone has a story to tell and that sharing our personal journeys- the good the bad and the ugly- helps us to become better versions of ourselves.

Before joining KNKX in 1999, Jennifer worked for KGMI in Bellingham, WILM News Radio in Wilmington, Delaware and Northwest Cable News in Seattle. She got her start in public radio at WRTI and WHYY in Philadelphia.

Jennifer grew up in Philadelphia and received her Bachelor of Arts in Journalism from Temple University. She lives in Seattle with her husband George, their two children, Lucinda and Henry as well as a menagerie that once included a cat that liked to hang out at the local bars and a crayfish that enjoyed roaming the house in the middle of the night.

Ways to Connect

Sara Feigl may not be able to smell the flowers, but she's totally unfazed by stinky port-a-potties.
Gabriel Spitzer / KNKX

 

It wasn’t until Sara Feigl was 15 years old that she realized something was missing. She was hanging out with her friend, who had just spent $12 on perfume. Feigl told her friend that it was a waste of money to buy water that had been dyed purple.

 

Feigl’s friend was confused by this. She said that it wasn’t just purple water. The friend told Feigl that the purple water smelled like lavender. Couldn’t she smell it?

 

Feigl smelled nothing.

 

In this photo taken on Thursday, April 26, 2018, a woman in a wheelchair passes a Pit Stop in San Francisco. The Pit Stop program provides public toilets, sinks, used needle receptacles and dog waste stations in San Francisco's most impacted neighborhoods
Ben Margot / The Associated Press

Seattle, like many other cities, commonly deals with people going to the bathroom in public spaces.  If you are someone who does not have access to shelter, finding a safe place to go to the bathroom in Seattle is especially difficult.

In fact, work by the Seattle Auditor’s Office revealed just how limited bathrooms are citywide: six publicly funded bathrooms are available for use 24/7, said City Auditor David Jones. And of the bathrooms available, few were usable.

Jennifer Wing

 

Sheree Cooks is a 37-year-old working mom of three. She’s been a leader of parent teacher groups in Tacoma. She gives talks to school administrators about race and equity, and she co-founded the nonprofit Eastside Community Action Network.

 

Jennifer Wing

 

Seattle writer Paulette Perhach likes to spend her food money at a typical boutique grocery store in Seattle. You know, the kind with hardwood floors, shelves that are curated with an ethical conscience — and really good cheese. Perhach is 36 years old. She’s a freelance writer who fully admits to liking fancier things she can’t afford. One of her favorite things to buy in this store is feelings.

 

Sound Effect host Gabriel Spitzer and climate scientist Judy Twedt, outside the KNKX studios in Belltown.
Jennifer Wing / KNKX

 

When most of us see scientific data presented on graphs and spreadsheets, the meaning behind the numbers can get lost pretty fast — even when they are explained by an expert.

 

One woman whose personal mission is to make this kind of information more accessible is Judy Twedt, a doctoral student at the University of Washington. She is so enthusiastic about communicating scientific information in an understandable way that she wears it for everyone to see.

 

Jennifer Wing / KNKX

This story originally aired on April 28, 2018.   

Living in illegal homeless encampments can be dangerous and chaotic. This is what hundreds of people experience every day in Seattle. This minimal type of shelter can also involve a lot of moving.

 

Sound Effect’s Jennifer Wing recently visited the removal of an encampment under the Viaduct, across the street from the Washington State Ferry Terminal in downtown Seattle. The cleanup was being carried out by the city’s Navigation Team, the entity in charge of removals.

Courtesy of Tim Haywood

This story originally aired on April 28, 2018.   

When Seattle writer, Tim Haywood was growing up in Auburn, he was the fat kid in elementary school. Most of the time, this wasn’t a problem, except for when it came to gym class.

"I got teased a lot, you know all of the names, fatty two-by-four. I managed to compensate a little bit. I developed a sense of humor," Tim recalls.

 

Courtesy Mike Lewis

 

This story originally aired on April 21, 2018.  

When the print edition of the Seattle Post Intelligencer came to an end in 2009, the reporters who worked for the paper scattered off to other careers. Some picked up other gigs covering news, others went into public relations. Veteran reporter Mike Lewis bought a bar.

 

Specifically, he bought his bar, a dive called The Streamline Tavern, where he and other reporters used to adjourn to after quitting time at the paper.

 

Courtesy of UW Medical Center

 


 

When a child is being cared for in a neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU, parents experience many emotions. They are grateful for the medical interventions that happen in these nurseries, but these situations are inherently stressful. Everything is in limbo.

 

Gabriel Spitzer / KNKX


 

 

By the time Stuart Olsen was 7 years old, he had endured more surgeries than most people experience in a lifetime. The focus of all of this medical attention and effort was on his legs.

 

“I must have had 11 or 12 surgeries to try and fix my legs,” Olsen said.

 

Michael Stravato / Associated Press

Back in the early 1980s, many people in El Salvador wanted an escape from poverty. They were trying to get the government to adopt policies that would redistribute that country’s wealth.

To the United States, these policies looked like communism.

Sup Pop CEO Megan Jasper having fun in the 1990s.
Courtesy of Sub Pop Records

 


 

Back in the early 1990s, all eyes were on Seattle. The local music scene was exploding. The young, flannel-wearing creatives of the Northwest had given birth to a new genre of music called grunge.

Jennifer Wing

 

This story originally aired on March 10, 2018.

Sometimes, our legal system can be a confusing mash up of laws and paperwork. The people whose job it is to sort through all of this to find some clarity are judges. Sometimes, they make decisions that aren’t very popular. One of these cases happened in Seattle, back in March, 2013.

 

Courtesy of Jennie Heideman

 


 

One evening in July 2017 in Spokane, Jennie Heideman was scrolling through Facebook when a post jumped out at her. It said a family with two little kids needed shelter for the night.

 

Sister Judy Byron (in blue, at left) having a dialogue with board members of Merck Pharmeceuticals in New York at the Interfaith Center.
courtesy of Judy Byron

When Judy Byron became a nun, she thought she'd spend her life wearing a habit and teaching school. And she did do that, for a while. But then an opportunity came along to make an impact in a different way.

Sister Judy became a shareholder. A shareholder in pursuit of justice.

Courtesy of Elmer Dixon

When Elmer Dixon was growing up in Seattle’s Madrona neighborhood in the early 1960s, the neighborhood was incredibly diverse. In the playground across the street from his house you could find every kind of kid.

“Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, black, white, Latino,” Elmer recalled.

Courtesy of Melba Ayco

 


When Melba Ayco was growing up in rural Louisiana, she was a curious child. She had two nicknames: Froggy, because she had large eyes, and “Mel-bad” because sometimes she got into mischief. If she broke something in her home, she never told her mother the truth.

 

Courtesy of the Oliver family

 

In 1989, Washington marked 100 years as an official state. Leading up to the milestone, state leaders held meetings about what the celebration should look like.

Emmett Sampson Oliver, a member of the Quinault Indian Nation, attended one of the planning sessions. At the end of the meeting, his son Marvin Oliver recalls, Emmett stood up and asked everyone in the room: "Wait a minute, what are you doing for indians?"

Marvin, a Seattle-based artist, says his dad called for their inclusion: "You're on their land."

COURTESY OF ALEX HUBBARD

 

This story originally aired on November 10, 2018. 

If you’ve spent any time walking around Seattle neighborhoods, you’ve probably spotted a “Fantasy A” poster bearing the name and image of a young African-American man.

His handmade fliers promote performances at local clubs and bars where he shares details about his life through rap music. He spends about six hours each day putting up posters.

“I’m a musician with autism and I write songs about my personal struggles,” Fantasy A said.

Jennifer Wing / KNKX

This story originally aired on February 17, 2018.

  If you own a dog, it is terrifying to find your beloved pet unresponsive to the point where they won’t even open their eyes when their name is spoken. About four of these cases come into the Blue Pearl Veterinary Clinic in South Tacoma each week.

 

Shanti Bhavan Children's Project

If you had to choose between accepting a multimillion-dollar inheritance, or using that money to build a school in India for children who are trapped in poverty, what would you do?

When Ajit George was 22 years old, this was the choice given to him by his father, Abraham George. Ajit George decided to forgo the money.

Derek Erdman

This story originally aired on January 13, 2018.  

Age 14 is often a time of pushing boundaries, experimenting with the the distinctions between right and wrong. 

Derek Erdman tells his personal story from when he was this awkward age. It involves youthful mischief, an answering machine and the Survivor song, Eye Of The Tiger. 

Derek played a prank that went a little bit too far.  But in the end, this one event helped reshape his moral compass and put him on a better path.

Courtesy of Kathlyn Horan

This story originally aired on January 13, 2018.  

When Seattle Police Officer Kim Bogucki stepped into the Washington Correctional Facility For Women in Purdy about 10 years ago, she had no intention of starting a non-profit.

Bogucki was doing gang prevention work and went to the prison to ask some of the women for permission to work with their children. The women were distrustful of police and gave Bogucki a chilly reception.

Jennifer Wiley

 

In the basement of Franklin High School in South Seattle there is a sprawling room full of lathes, band saws and sanding equipment. In one of the room’s closets, tree stumps wait to be turned into polished bowls, guitar stands and bookcases.

Before he was gunned down last year on June 2 in Martha Washington Park, 17-year-old Ryan Dela Cruz made things in this wood shop.

Jennifer Wing

 

A large stone, covered in brambles, in the backyard of a house set to be torn down in Seattle’s International District was Paula Johnson Burke’s first introduction to a man named Shinjiro Honda.

Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

At the corner of South King Street and Eighth Avenue South in Seattle’s International District, the inviting smell of almonds and sugar permeates the air. This is where thousands of fortune cookies are born each week. But this is also the birthplace to 17 different varieties of noodles.

 

Courtesy of Patrick Haggerty

This story originally aired on March 31, 2018.   

In 1973, in the midst of the Stonewall era, a Seattle band called Lavender Country released an eponymous album. The album delivered radical politics with a country twang, and became known as the world's first openly gay country album.

In this interview, Patrick Haggerty tells Gabriel Spitzer  how the album lived, and died, and lived again. He also explains why the album might never have existed if it weren't for his father--a "hayseed" of a dairy farmer who gave his son permission to be exactly who he was.

 

This story originally aired on January 6, 2018.  

People will go to great lengths in pursuit of wealth. Mountains will be literally moved in order to make them release the mineral bounty they contain. This is the drive that led to the creation of Monte Cristo, a mining town founded in the North Cascades back in the late 1800s.

 

Today, Monte Cristo is a ghost town. Yet, it still has a hold on people like David Cameron.

 

Jennifer Wing

 


In 1956, Rita Zawaideh's parents made the decision to move the family to the United States so that their children would have a better education. They left their large extended, Roman Catholic family behind in Jordan. They eventually settled in Seattle, where Zawaideh lives today.

 

In this story, Zawaideh talks about the difficult consequences of making choices when she was a young woman that her family did not agree with and about the love that came from an unexpected community.

 

Jennifer Wing

On a farm just off Highway 20, in the Skagit Valley north of Mount Vernon, Washington, Geoff Gould opens up the doors to a barn.

 

Gould is 57 years old with a little bit of gray at his temples. He’s wearing glasses and his boots are covered in mud. Sitting before us, on pallets that somehow hold their weight, are two enormous pumpkins and a squash.

 

Pages