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City of Olympia may ban pet stores from selling commercially bred puppies and kittens

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Jose Luis Magana
/
The Associated Press

The City of Olympia could soon ban the retail sale of commercially bred puppies and kittens. It's aimed at preventing pet stores from selling animals from so-called puppy mills and kitten factories.

Animal welfare advocates say if you buy a puppy from a pet store, chances are good it's from a puppy mill where animals are kept in crowded and unhealty conditions. Michelle Andrews, an advocate for a new city ordinance regarding pet store sales of animals, told the Olympia City Council that even if a puppy being sold is healthy it doesn't mean the breeding conditions are good.

 

"You know those parents of those puppies are locked up for their whole life just to make money for these companies," she said.   

  

Under the proposed ordinance, retailers would only be allowed to sell rescue dogs and kittens or those from animal shelters.

 

Kona is up for adoption at a shelter in Olympia. Under the proposed ordinance, pet stores would be allowed to offer rescue and shelter dogs.
Kona is up for adoption at a shelter in Olympia. Under the proposed ordinance, pet stores would be allowed to offer rescue and shelter dogs.

 

The owners of Puppyworld in Olympia, who testified at a City Council meeting, are opposed to the ordinance. They say it would be unfair to their business. They say they only buy from reputable breeders they personally check out.

 

The proposed ordinance would not apply to individual breeders who sell directly to customers.

 

Several Washington cities, including Poulsbo and Bremerton, have passed similar ordinances. A Washington state bill that would have banned the retail sale of commercially bred pets didn't make it out of committee this year. Two states, Maryland and California, have instituted bans.

 

Paula reports on groundbreaking legal decisions in Washington State and on trends in crime and law enforcement. She’s been at KNKX since 1989 and has covered the Law and Justice beat for the past 15 years. Paula grew up in Idaho and, prior to KNKX, worked in public radio and television in Boise, San Francisco and upstate New York.