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Environment

Major Canadian railway looking to 'CanaPux' to transport oil from tar sands

In this May 3, 2018 photo, a camp set up by demonstrators opposed to the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline through the Canadian Rockies, stands outside the Kinder Morgan Inc. oil storage facility on Burnaby Mountain above the harbor in Vancouver.
Jeremy Hainsworth
/
The Associated Press
In this May 3, 2018 photo, a camp set up by demonstrators opposed to the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline through the Canadian Rockies, stands outside the Kinder Morgan Inc. oil storage facility on Burnaby Mountain above the harbor in Vancouver.

As further review of the Trans Mountain Pipeline continues, a number of First Nations in Alberta are making overtures to buy the project. At the same time, one of Canada’s railways is teaming up with another First Nation to temporarily convert oil into CanaPux, oil bricks that resemble hockey pucks. KNKX’s Craig McCulloch reports.

The Canadian government bought the pipeline last year for $3.4 billion ($4.5 billion Canadian) from Houston-based Kinder Morgan.

A federal Canadian court halted the pipeline’s expansion in August, saying Canada’s National Energy Board needs to review impacts the increased tanker traffic would have on marine wildlife. It also ruled that the Canadian government failed to consult with First Nations, such as the Tsleil-Waututh, Squamish and Musqueam First Nations in greater Vancouver, who are strongly opposed to the pipeline.

Northwest tribes such as Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, Tulalip Tribes, Lummi Nation and Suquamish Tribe testified against the pipeline at the Canadian National Energy Board hearing in November.

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