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Flugelhornist Dmitri Matheny honors Cascadia at KNKX

 Flugelhornist Dmitri Matheny performing new songs from his latest release Cascadia in the KNKX Seattle Studios.
Parker Miles Blohm
/
KNKX
Flugelhornist Dmitri Matheny performing new songs from his latest release Cascadia in the KNKX Seattle Studios.

Dmitri Matheny arrived in the Northwest with his flugelhorn less than a decade ago. Now, from his home base in Centralia, Matheny has become an important member of the Puget Sound area jazz scene. His new album "Cascadia" honors his new community, and KNKX welcomed Matheny and his quintet for an exclusive performance in our Seattle studios.

Matheny's beautiful, lyrical tone on his "big horn" is matched by a talent for songwriting and a knack for turning tired pop songs into journeys of melodic discovery. In his last visit to KNKX, his band brightened up the Carpenters hit "Close to You." Matheny brings a fresh arrangement to the Glen Campbell chart topper "Wichita Lineman," a favorite of his father who passed away during the pandemic.

Some of the Northwest's finest jazz musicians joined Matheny on a pair of original songs as well. Jay Thomas played saxophone with Bill Anschell, Phil Sparks and Mark Ivester on piano, bass and drums.

Matheny's "Evergreen Girl" for his sweetheart Sassy is a swinging hardbop piece in the mold of his mentor Art Farmer. "Bourdain" was written for chef, traveler and "xenophile in a time of xenophobes" Anthony Bourdain, and features Mark Ivester drumming with and without sticks to fine effect.

Matheny hinted about a Brazilian music duet project with guitarist John Stowell but told studio session host Abe Beeson: "It's not quite cooked yet." For now, Matheny continues to celebrate "Cascadia" and his jazz community.

Songs:
1) Evergreen Girl
2) Bourdain
3) Wichita Lineman

Abe grew up in Western Washington, a 3rd generation Seattle/Tacoma kid. It was as a student at Pacific Lutheran University that Abe landed his first job at KNKX, editing and producing audio for news stories. It was a Christmas Day shift no one else wanted that gave Abe his first on-air experience which led to overnights, then Saturday afternoons, and started hosting Evening Jazz in 1998.