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Seattle JazzED presents Girls Jazz Day online this Sunday

A collage of four women on a bright pink background. The words "Girls Jazz Day 2021" appear in white.
Courtesy of Seattle JazzED
Bassist Endea Owens, saxophonist Grace Kelly, vocalist Martina DaSilva, pianist Miki Yamanaka

The Girls Jazz Day mission is to create safe space for female musicians to own their voice, feel empowered in improvisation and take musical risks. The program is open to girls and female-identified or gender non-conforming youths who play an instrument or sing.

Why have a Girls Jazz Day?

Because most professional jazz musicians are men, and most jazz students are men and boys.

Because female jazz students are frequently overlooked when soloists are chosen.

Because female jazz students deserve to watch and learn from professional female jazz performers and educators.

And because, as we head toward another round of year-end "best of" lists, it's clear that women are still under-represented in recorded jazz.

Girls Jazz Day was an idea developed by Seattle JazzED in 2013. Seattle JazzED is one of the largest jazz education organizations in the country, serving more than 1,000 students annually. They'd like to see more girls in their bands.

Celebrity teaching artists for this year's virtual Girls Jazz Day are bassist Endea Owens, saxophonist Grace Kelly, pianist Miki Yamanaka and vocalist Martina DaSilva.

This Zoom-based event on Dec. 12 from 3 to 5 p.m. PT is open to all female-identifying students in grades 6-12 with at least one year of experience on their instrument. All instruments, including strings and voice, are welcome. Register here.

Seattle JazzED is committed to this event — and all of its programs — being financially accessible for ALL families. There is a sliding-scale tuition, and a tuition waiver is available.

Because girls rock. And girls jazz.

#jazzgirl

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