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Listen: Rural Washington county removes cybersecurity device designed to protect U.S. elections

A video screengrab of the meeting earlier this year where Ferry County commissioners voted to remove a cybersecurity device called an Albert sensor from the Washington state county's computer network.
Ferry County, Wash./Screenshot provided by Austin Jenkins/Northwest News Network
A video screengrab of the meeting earlier this year where Ferry County commissioners voted to remove a cybersecurity device called an Albert sensor from the Washington state county's computer network.

After Russian hacking attempts leading up to the 2016 election, hundreds of local governments took action. Some installed what's called an Albert sensor, a device designed to detect hacking attempts from outside their network.

There are now about 900 Albert sensors nationwide and the technology has become a key federal strategy to protect U.S. elections. But, some on the political right in Ferry County, Washington didn't see it that way.

Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins reported that story with NPR's Miles Parks, which aired during All Things Considered on August 29. Austin joined KNKX morning edition host Kirsten Kendrick live to explain.

Kirsten Kendrick has been hosting Morning Edition on KNKX/KPLU since 2006. She has worked in news radio for more than 30 years. Kirsten is also a sports lover. She handles most sports coverage at the station, including helping produce a two-part series on the 50th anniversary of Title IX and the ongoing series "Going Deep."
Vivian McCall is a reporter, producer and host at KNKX. Originally from Texas, Vivian spent the majority of her journalism career in Chicago. She loves having fun with sound and digging into cool science stories.
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