United Airlines | KNKX

United Airlines

In this image taken from video, the engine of United Airlines Flight 328 is on fire after after experiencing "a right-engine failure" shortly after takeoff from Denver International Airport on Feb. 20, 2021. The Boeing 777 landed safely.
Chad Schnell / via AP

Boeing has recommended that airlines ground all 777s with the type of engine that blew apart after takeoff from Denver this weekend, and most carriers that fly those planes said they would temporarily pull them from service.

In the wake of recent high profile incidents of customer mistreatment, most notably, the viral video of airport security officers dragging a passenger off a United Airlines plane last month, commercial airlines are scrambling to regain the trust of air travelers.

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

The CEO of United Airlines is in the hot seat on Capitol Hill this morning, answering pointed questions from members of Congress about last month's incident in which a United passenger was dragged off a plane.

"It was a mistake of epic proportions," United CEO Oscar Munoz told representatives, as he explained how United has changed its rules moving forward. "In hindsight, clearly our policies broke down."

Updated on 4/28 at 1:15 p.m. ET

United Airlines and lawyers for the passenger seen on video being dragged from a United airliner in Chicago say the man has reached "an amicable settlement" with the airline. The terms of the agreement were not announced.

A couple flying to Costa Rica for their wedding were removed from a United Airlines flight in Houston on Saturday.

The incident happened nearly a week after a video showing a passenger being dragged off a Chicago-to-Louisville flight went viral.

Michael Hohl and Amber Maxwell are scheduled to get married on Thursday.

David Dao, the 69-year-old Kentucky doctor dragged off a United Express flight on Sunday night, suffered a concussion and broken nose in the incident and lost two teeth, his attorney said Thursday.

Dao will need reconstructive surgery, lawyer Thomas Demetrio announced at a news conference in Chicago.

He said there will "probably" be a lawsuit over the airline's actions.

The reaction from the public started with gasps of horror and built to cries for a boycott.

Now, a day and a half later, United Airlines is admitting it did something wrong.

On Sunday night, a passenger on a United Express flight from Chicago to Louisville, Ky., was told he had to give up his ticket so a United crew member could take his seat. The man refused: He's a doctor and said he had patients he had to see.

Updated at 8:50 a.m. ET April 17

An annual study of airline quality in the U.S. gave airlines the highest scores in the 26 years the rankings have been published.

You may be wondering: How is that possible?

Updated at 6:11 p.m. ET

Passengers on a United Express flight from Chicago to Louisville, Ky., were horrified when a man was forcibly removed — violently wrenched from his seat and physically dragged down the aisle — apparently to clear a seat for airline staff. Videos of the scene have prompted calls to boycott United Airlines.

On Twitter, a representative of the United said the flight in question was "overbooked" and that "one customer refused to leave."

Airlines have surprisingly strict dress codes for people traveling on "buddy passes," and astonishingly tone-deaf explanations.

Those are two takeaways from a story on Sunday that prompted shock and outrage on social media.

Beginning in 2017, United Airlines will offer cheaper airfares for budget-conscious travelers.

"Basic economy" will be lower priced than regular fares, allowing United to compete head to head with discount airlines such as Spirit, Frontier and Allegiant Air.

But there's a trade-off for passengers who will be giving up some of the few remaining perks of air travel, like putting a carry-on suitcase in the overhead bin or getting an assigned seat.

United Airlines says Jeff Smisek has stepped down as CEO, chairman and president effective immediately and has named Oscar Munoz as president and chief executive officer.

Boeing

Even in this day and age, aviation is a male-dominated industry. But when Boeing delivered a new 737-900ER to United Airlines on Wednesday at King County International Airport, men were the ones in the minority – by design.

Many travelers using United Airlines faced delays Tuesday, but they weren't connected to Hurricane Isaac. Instead, the airline's computer network crashed, leaving large parts of its system paralyzed Tuesday afternoon.

First noted around 2:15 p.m. EDT, the problems persisted until about 6:30 p.m. EDT, when the airline tweeted that it is "in the process of resuming operations and rebooking customers."