Ruth Bader Ginsburg | KNKX

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., speaks about the coronavirus during a media availability on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, March 3, 2020 in Washington.
Alex Brandon / The Associated Press

Both of Washington's U.S. senators are Democrats, putting them in their chamber's minority. That puts them in a tough position as the Senate seeks to confirm President Donald Trump's third Supreme Court nominee.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being remembered in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol, where she will lie in state in Statuary Hall. Watch the ceremony.

James Doyle / NPR

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being remembered in a private ceremony at the high court, where her body is lying in repose. Watch the ceremony.

While political Washington is in a tizzy about the election and what it portends for the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is prepping for her operatic debut in Italian composer Gaetano Donizetti's "The Daughter of the Regiment."

For one night in November, the diminutive legal diva will play the nonsinging role of the Duchess of Krakenthorp, a character akin to the dowagers in Marx Brothers movies.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is walking back a critical comment she made about some NFL players for refusing to stand for the national anthem at football games.

In a recent book interview, Ginsburg was asked how she felt about the protest by San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick and two of his teammates.

She replied that while entirely legal, she thought it was "dumb and disrespectful." But trying to make such protests illegal, she said, would be "dangerous."

"What I would do is strongly take issue with the view they are expressing," she said.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has apologized for what she called "ill-advised" comments she made earlier this week criticizing presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

"On reflection, my recent remarks in response to press inquiries were ill-advised and I regret making them," Ginsburg said in a statement Thursday morning. "Judges should avoid commenting on a candidate for public office. In the future I will be more circumspect."

"Women belong in all places where decisions are being made," U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg once said.

Thanks to scientists from The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, it might be time for an update:

"Female insects belong in all places where species classifications are being made," perhaps?