Recep Tayyip Erdogan | KNKX

Recep Tayyip Erdogan

A day after a protest at the Turkish ambassador's residence in Washington, D.C., turned violent, the State Department is criticizing Turkey's government.

Video appears to show security forces belonging to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan pushing past police and violently breaking up the demonstration.

Some of the protesters were knocked down and kicked repeatedly in the head. Nearly a dozen people were injured.

On the same day that Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan visited President Trump at the White House, protesters were gathered outside the Turkish ambassador's residence in Washington, D.C.

During Tuesday's demonstrations, an altercation broke out and nine people were injured, two seriously, and two arrests were made.

Dustin Stenbeck, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Police Department, says the fight was between two groups.

He didn't elaborate, but did say that one of the people arrested was charged with assaulting a police officer.

Judging by public statements, U.S.-Turkey relations are going to be just fine.

President Trump hosted Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Tuesday afternoon, and both men had warm messages to share even after the two countries clashed last week over a decision by the United States to arm Kurdish fighters in Syria.

Trump spent much of his statement complimenting the Turkish military.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is visiting the White House on Tuesday, looking for a "new beginning" to U.S.-Turkey relations, even as the two countries clash over the Trump administration's decision to arm Kurdish forces in Syria.

U.S. military officials view the Kurds there as key in the fight against ISIS, but the Turkish government argues they're terrorists.

Turkish authorities have launched a massive detention operation, arresting more than 1,000 people nationwide on Wednesday. The Turkish government says the arrests are aimed at supporters of the U.S-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, whom President Recep Tayyip Erdogan blames for last year's failed coup attempt.

Turkey's Prime Minister Binali Yildirim declared victory in the referendum bid to convert Turkey from a parliamentary to a strong president system of government.

The historic referendum, which passed by a narrow margin, grants more power to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who promised when he was elected in 2014 to be a "different kind of president."

Turkish voters will decide Sunday whether to replace the Turkish Republic's parliamentary form of government with a strong presidency. It's a vote that could alter — or, opponents say, endanger — the democratic traditions of this key U.S. ally. Turkey is a NATO member helping fight ISIS.

If the referendum passes, it will increase the power of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Polls released late in the campaign showed a narrow lead for "yes," with a large number still declaring themselves undecided. Erdogan is predicting at least a 55 percent margin for "yes."

During his first trip to Turkey as secretary of state, Rex Tillerson said the U.S. and its NATO ally were struggling with "difficult choices" on a strategy to defeat the Islamic State in Syria.

The U.S. has been trying to balance its reliance on Turkey in the fight against ISIS with its support for Kurdish fighters in northern Syria — which infuriates Turkey. Tillerson said he and Turkish leaders discussed options for how to clear the extremist group from its remaining strongholds, such as Raqqa, and stabilize those areas.

German prosecutors have dropped a controversial investigation of a comedian who read a lewd poem on German television mocking Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, citing a lack of evidence.

Turkey's national security council is recommending a three-month extension of the state of emergency imposed following a failed coup attempt in July.

The council is chaired by the Turkey's president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has presided over tens of thousands of dismissals and arrests of opposition leaders, journalists and others since the initial state of emergency went into effect on July 20, NPR's Peter Kenyon reports.

Turks survived a chaotic and bloody attempted military takeover on Friday that left more than 260 dead. Since then, the government has suspended thousands of public and private sector employees — everyone from teachers to police officers. Meanwhile, the parliament has ratified a state of emergency that will last up to three months. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says it's necessary to protect democracy. But many Turks are afraid of what's to come.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has announced a three-month state of emergency for Turkey following a failed coup attempt over the weekend.

The state of emergency will give broad powers to security forces and the government, NPR's Peter Kenyon reports. Erdogan says it will make it more efficient to round up, question and try people accused of supporting the coup.