Other News | KNKX

Other News

Interesting news stories from around the Pacific Northwest.

Gabriel Spitzer / KNKX

This story originally aired on April 28, 2018.  

If you close your eyes and picture Sasquatch, there’s a good chance you’ll conjure up a very specific image: a big, hairy humanoid, mid-stride, arms swinging, head turned to glance back over its right shoulder.

In that iconic picture, the thing Bigfoot was turning back to look at was Bob Gimlin.

Almin Zrno

 

This story originally aired Oct. 13, 2018.  

In the early 1990s, Gino Jevdjevic was living the typical life of a Yugoslavian popstar.

He signed autographs and posed for pictures with fans. He wore his hair in a ponytail and crooned schmaltzy melodies.

These days, Gino has a shaved head, a multitude of tattoos and a long, grey-streaked beard. He lives in Seattle, and his music is closer to metal or “Gypsy Punk” than it is to pop.

Stephen Brashear / AP

This story originally aired April 2, 2016.  

Last December, St. Louis (now Los Angeles) Rams punter Johnny Hekker, an Edmonds resident who grew up in Bothell,  did not make many new friends in the Pacific Northwest. He punted the ball to the Seahawks, and after the play was over, he came up behind Seattle defensive end Cliff Avril and drilled him to the ground.

Credit Gabriel Spitzer

This story originally aired on December 9, 2017.   

Lois Langrebe has taught Lushootseed for over two decades, a dying language of the Tulalip tribes that she’s struggling to keep from going extinct.

It’s an important role that she never expected to fill while growing up.

A child of adoption, Lois was raised by a white family, knowing little about her origins or the culture of Native Americans. For years she struggled with her identity and finding a place that truly felt like home.

Youths float atop stand-up paddle boards offshore at Seattle's Alki Beach on July 29. To the south, in Pierce County, large gatherings of young people are causing a surge in COVID-19 cases among people between the ages of 20 to 29 years old.
Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press

Right now, there are more than 2,000 contact tracers working across Washington state. Kelsie Lane is one of them.

Contact tracing is a low-tech approach to keeping the virus in check. But it’s only effective if officials have timely test results.

At KNKX, we value high-quality, factual information in our news programming and we aim to present an array of voices that reflect our region.

We turn to our regular commentators for their expertise and points-of-view when it comes to sports, food and the weather. But if a commentator, even on his own independent platform, delivers rhetoric that is offensive and inaccurate, we cannot support it.

The Crocodile in Seattle
Joe Mabel / Wikimedia Commons

The statewide stay-at-home order shuttered live music venues in March. Now, those businesses are questioning if they will be able to survive, with no source of revenue for the foreseeable future.

That could be the fate for The Crocodile in Seattle's Belltown neighborhood, despite the venue receiving a Paycheck Protection Program loan. 

ADRIAN FLOREZ / KNKX

This show originally aired on November 9, 2019. 

Courtesy of Grace Sullivan

 

This story originally aired on November 9, 2019.  

If you went back in time and told 14-year-old Grace Sullivan that she’d grow up to study biology, she probably wouldn’t know what you were talking about. 

 

That’s because 14-year-old Grace didn’t know about cells, or atoms, or what a negative number was. Instead, her schooling covered what her parents considered relevant: quilting, knitting, grinding wheat, canning — and most of all, bible study. 

 

Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

This story originally aired on November 9, 2019.  

  The Manastash Ridge Observatory, or the MRO, sits on top of a huge stretch of earth that pops out of the surrounding landscape of flat timothy hay fields.The ridge is actually an earthquake fault line, one of several in this part of the state.

Susan Lieu performing "140 LBS: How Beauty Killed My Mother."  Her mother, Jennifer Ha, is on the screen behind her.
Joe Iano

 

This story originally aired on Nov. 9, 2019.  

Growing up in Santa Rosa, California, Susan Lieu’s mother, Jennifer Ha, was the glue that held her Vietnamese family together. 

 

Protesters sit on a sidewalk in downtown Seattle after being hit with pepper spray by Seattle police earlier this summer.
Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

We, the undersigned public media institutions of Washington state, stand with our fellow news outlets in voicing our deep concern and strong disagreement with the recent decision in King County Superior Court that would compel The Seattle Times, KIRO 7, KING 5, KOMO 4 and KCPQ 13 to hand over unpublished images and video to the Seattle Police Department.

Amid nationwide calls to defund the police, Tacoma is calling on the public to show officials how it should be done. The city is facing a bigger deficit than it’s seen in years because of the coronavirus pandemic — more than $67 million, or about 15 percent overall.

It’s also in the midst of trying to transform the city government and its services through comprehensive anti-racism policies.

So, Tacoma officials have invited members of the public to try their hand using an interactive online tool. It’s called Balancing Act.

Courtesy of Erica C. Barnett

For the past 19 years, journalist Erica C. Barnett has been covering local politics in the Seattle area. For much of that time, she was struggling with alcoholism.

Addiction, she says, turned out to be the one problem she couldn’t talk her way out of. In her new book “Quitter: A Memoir of Drinking, Relapse and Recovery,” she takes readers on her circuitous journey to sobriety.

This photo shows a sign at the headquarters for Washington state's Employment Security Department Tuesday, May 26, 2020, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash.
Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

A federal benefit that added $600 to weekly unemployment payments is set to expire July 31. Last week was the final week for recipients to collect the extra funds. KNKX’s Rebekah Way spoke with residents who are receiving unemployment about what the change means for them.

Individual listeners are the largest source of financial support for the jazz, blues, and NPR news you count on at KNKX.  Your vital support makes everything we do possible. These new 2020 initiatives, along with all of our daily jazz, blues, and news services, are fueled by the generosity of listeners:

The port of entry to Point Roberts, a tan building with a flagpole out front.
J. Stephen Conn / Flickr Creative Commons

The border between the United States and Canada remains closed to all but essential travel. The closure went into effect in mid-March and it has been repeatedly extended as the pandemic grows, particularly in the U.S.

It’s caused a lot of difficulty for the people who live and work along the 5,525-mile border. But perhaps no community in the United States is in the situation of Point Roberts, Washington.

ADRIAN FLOREZ / KNKX

This show originally aired on October 26, 2019.

Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX Public Radio

 

This story originally aired on October 26, 2019.   

The internet didn’t ruin Louis Collins's job, but it sure sucked the fun out of it. 

 

People no longer needed his help when it came to finding books — they could just look it up on their own computer. For a used book dealer like Collins, this was bad news, and he didn’t take it lightly.

 

Courtesy of Sam Blackman

This story originally aired on October 26, 2019.

When Sam Blackman first met his adopted baby daughter in 2007, the pediatrician and first-time father says he did the one thing he knew instinctively how to do: examine her from head to toe. 

 

“I put my ear up to her chest and listened to her heartbeat, listening for murmurs,” he says. “But in the end all I could find was a beautiful healthy child. Our child.”

 

Autumn Adams

 

This story originally aired on October 26, 2019.  

A good way to picture Autumn Adams is in her crimson cap and gown. This was last spring, as she graduated from Central Washington University in Ellensburg. 

 

 

By her side were two people: her 14-year-old brother John and her 10-year-old sister Kaya. Nothing unusual about family showing up for a big milestone like this.

 

But, Adams’ family is a little different from the other young grads there that day with their moms and uncles and grandmas. Autumn’s younger siblings have been there with her, on campus, for most of her college education.

 

courtesy of Suzan Mazor

This story originally aired on October 26, 2019.

Suzan Mazor was fully in mid-life when her mother made a surprising revelation. "You were conceived by sperm donation," she remembers her mother saying, "and I believe that the OB who delivered you was also the sperm donor."

While some people who learn this news are devastated, Suzan's response was, she says, characteristic for her. "I'm just a very open minded person, and I thought it was cool."

Donnie Chin standing, in uniform, in front of the East Kong Yick building in Seattle’s Chinatown International District in 2004.
Dean Wong

Donnie Chin, longtime director of the International District Emergency Center (IDEC), was a hero within Seattle’s Chinatown-International District. In the 1970s and '80s, Chin led a group of young first responders, mostly kids from the neighborhood, who stood guard as the community’s firefighters, medics and rescuers.

They were known as Donnie’s Kids.

Adrian Florez / KNKX

 

Tammy Edwards survived COVID-19. It was miserable, but she made it. She had hoped that once the virus ran its course, she could then get back to her life and her work as a nurse in Tacoma. 

Federal guidelines suggest a typical person sick with COVID should get better after a week or two. Tammy Edwards is three months past that point, and she is still recovering. 

The aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson moves out of dry dock at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, in April 2020.
Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ethan J. Soto / U.S. Navy

Two people were fired and 13 others disciplined after a 10-month investigation into sexual harassment and toxic workplace culture at the Navy’s huge shipyard in Bremerton.

Lexi Walls / Veesler Lab, UW

One of the nation’s first human clinical trials testing a vaccine for the novel coronavirus is producing encouraging results, according to the Seattle-based scientists leading the study. 

Researchers at Kaiser Permanente Washington started the phase-one trial on March 16. In this early phase of developing a vaccine, researchers want to ensure mainly that it does not pose serious health risks, and that it does boost immunity. 

Portrait courtesy of Christian Sebastian Parker / Composite by Parker Miles Blohm

As a country, the United States has had previous moments where race has come to the forefront of our national dialogue, and where protests have called for change.

Politico Magazine recently published takes from a handful of experts about whether this current moment of racial reckoning is any different than those previous. They included an essay from Christopher Sebastian Parker, professor of political science at the University of Washington. 

This show originally aired on October 19, 2019.

Alison Krupnick on an early trip to Ho Chi Minh City, circa 1989.
Courtesy of Alison Krupnick

 

This story originally aired on October 19, 2019. 

 

The Vietnam War officially ended in 1973, but people continued to flee the country well into the 1980s. Hundreds of thousands of people escaped the country on boats. Thousands died at sea. It was an international humanitarian crisis. The men, women and children fleeing were called boat people.

 

Gabriel Spitzer / KNKX

 

This story originally aired on October 19, 2019.

Grace Jo was 6 years old when her mom scooped up her and her older sister, and set out to cross the Tumen River into China. 

 

“We walked three nights and four days,” Jo said, recalling the trek along rocky mountain trails. “A lot of tree branches were hurting our skin. A lot of wild animal sounds we could hear at night, and we had to hide from people.”

 

At the river’s edge, the water level went up to her mother’s hips. 

 

“My mom managed, and all three of us able to cross river and come to China.” 

 

But escaping North Korea and finding freedom are two different things. Five years later, Jo and her family were captured, and deported back to North Korea. 

 

  The fact that she’s alive, not imprisoned or executed, is kind of miraculous. She — and hundreds of other North Korean refugees — owe their lives to a Seattle-area man named John Yoon. 

 

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