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incarceration

Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press

The state is taking steps to reduce Washington's prison population to stop the spread of COVID-19. Gov. Jay Inslee has issued a new emergency proclamation and an order commuting the sentences of some nonviolent inmates. 

Tarra Simmons, an attorney who previously served time in prison, plans to run for the Washington Legislature.
Courtesy of Tarra Simmons

A Washington attorney and criminal justice reform advocate who previously served time in prison is seeking to become the first formerly incarcerated person elected to the Washington Legislature, at least in modern times. 

Tarra Simmons, of Bremerton, who in 2017 won a Supreme Court fight to sit for the state bar exam, despite her prior criminal conviction, formally announced her candidacy for the state House on Monday.

An abandoned cell at the former McNeil Island Prison. The Washington History Museum is hosting a forum this weekend about life after incarceration. It's organized in conjunction with the museum's exhibit about McNeil Island's now-abandoned prison.
Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

Former prisoners will gather in Tacoma tomorrow to talk about life after incarceration at a forum hosted by the Washington State History Museum.

Elaine Thompson / AP Photo

The American Civil Liberties Union is suing Pierce County, claiming jail inmates with mental illness are treated poorly and denied access to care. 

More than a hundred female federal inmates, sentenced to long-term prison, have instead been held for years in two windowless rooms in a detention center in Brooklyn.

Conditions for the women have been found to violate international standards for the treatment of prisoners.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Nearly 30 juvenile killers currently serving life sentences without the possibility of parole in Washington could be eligible for release in the future, thanks to a new state law that took effect this month.

The law was passed in response to a 2012 U.S. Supreme Court ruling. In Miller v. Alabama, the Supreme Court ruled that automatic sentences of life without parole for juvenile killers are unconstitutional. In response, the Washington state Legislature this year passed a law that requires new, individualized sentences for these aggravated murderers.