Election 2016 | KNKX

Election 2016

knkx, along with NPR, will bring you all the information you will need as we close in on Election Day 2016. Stay up to date with local and national issues along with stories about how this election cycle will affect you and your family here in Washington and around the world.

Also be sure to check out our series on Sound Transit's Proposition 1, also known as Sound Transit 3. You can read more about ST3 and this series here

Be sure to stay up-to-date with out national converge too by clicking here

Updated at 9:38 p.m. ET

The Justice Department charged 12 Russian intelligence officers on Friday with a litany of alleged offenses related to Russia's hacking of the Democratic National Committee's emails, state election systems and other targets in 2016.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who announced the indictments, said the Russians involved belonged to the military intelligence service GRU. They are accused of a sustained cyberattack against Democratic Party targets, including its campaign committee and Hillary Clinton's campaign.

Updated at 7:55 p.m. ET

President Trump said Wednesday he is willing to be interviewed under oath by special counsel Robert Mueller, who is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible collusion with Trump's campaign.

In an impromptu meeting with reporters, Trump said he is "looking forward" to talking with Mueller. "I would love to do it," he said, going on to say he "would do it under oath." Trump added he would take his lawyers' advice.

Updated 12/2, 11:47 a.m. ET

President Trump's first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, pleaded guilty Friday to lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador during the transition, and he is cooperating with the special counsel's investigation into Moscow's interference in last year's election.

Flynn told investigators that he was instructed to engage with the Russians by senior members of the Trump transition team.

The first charges have been filed in the special counsel investigation into Russian interference in the U.S. election, and the court documents help make clearer the timeline of Russia-related events that took place during the presidential campaign.

George Papadopoulos, who worked for President Trump's campaign as a foreign policy adviser, has pleaded guilty to lying to FBI agents about meeting a professor with Russian ties who had promised to provide "dirt" on Trump's Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Apparent Russian agents began reaching out to Donald Trump's presidential campaign as early as March 2016, the Justice Department established in documents released Monday, with appeals for partnership and offers of help including "dirt" on Trump's opponent, Hillary Clinton.

That case is made in charging documents in the case of then-Trump foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos, who pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI.

Russian hackers attempted to penetrate Washington and Oregon’s voter registration systems last year. Top elections officials in both states received that confirmation Friday from the Department of Homeland Security.

The Oregon and Washington Secretaries of State announced Friday that they have referred dozens of cases of double-voting or dead people voting in the last presidential election for possible criminal prosecution.

Political strategists, take note: For the first time, millennials and Gen Xers outvoted their elders in 2016, according to data from the Pew Research Center.

Fully 69.6 million millennials (defined as people who were 18 to 35 in 2016) and members of Generation X (ages 36 to 51) cast votes in 2016, according to a Pew analysis of data from the Census Bureau. By comparison, 67.9 million baby boomers and members of older generations voted.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Washington's Republican Secretary of State says her office will review a letter from President Donald Trump's commission investigating alleged election voter fraud asking for a list of names, party affiliations, addresses and voting histories of all voters.

Kim Wyman said Thursday that as with any public records request, her office is required to comply pursuant to state law.

Ever since election night last November, millions in America and around the world have wondered what happened to Hillary Clinton, who was widely expected to become the first female president of the United States.

In fact, nearly everyone in the business of politics thought she would win, including many of Trump's own people.

So how did she lose?

One day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, women’s rights demonstrations are unfolding across the nation Saturday. 

Seattle's women's march is expected to be the third largest in the country, after similar events in Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles. That’s not surprising for a city where Trump won just 8 percent of the vote.

Wash. Democratic Electoral College members Levi Guerra and Bret Chiafalo explain a plan to encourage Republican electors in other states to vote for an alternative candidate to Donald Trump.
Will James / knkx

A handful of Democratic Electoral College members are hatching a plan to deny Donald Trump the presidency. 

Four Democratic electors from Washington and Colorado are leading the effort to persuade 37 Republican electors in other states to vote for someone other than Trump.

They're calling themselves "Hamilton Electors," claiming to honor Alexander Hamilton's vision of the Electoral College as outlined in Federalist Paper 68.

LIAM MORIARTY / JEFFERSON PUBLIC RADIO

The recent election saw California and three other states join Oregon, Washington, Colorado and Alaska in legalizing recreational use of marijuana. Four more states voted for medical cannabis, as well. But the burgeoning cannabis industry has relied on an Obama Administration policy of tolerating state laws that regulate a drug that’s still federally illegal. With a new administration talking over in Washington D.C., what does this mean for legal pot?

Could Trump Pop The West Coast's Liberal Bubble?

Nov 23, 2016

In November’s election, Republicans around the country won big up and down the ballot. But wins for conservatives were far fewer here on the West Coast, where voters largely doubled down on progressive policies and candidates.

Washington voters decided to increase the minimum wage. California joined the Pacific Northwest in legalizing recreational marijuana. And Oregon elected Democrat Kate Brown: the first openly bisexual governor in the country.

"Give Thanks to Family" by OakleyOriginals is licensed under CC BY 2.0 bit.ly/2grQHKE

If you’ve been on social media since the election, you’ve probably seen a lot of people expressing their feelings. Regardless of how you feel about the results, a lot of us might find ourselves in difficult conversations over the next few weeks — especially as families gather together for the holidays.

We turned to David Domke for some help. He’s a professor at the University of Washington who studies the way we talk to each other about politics.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP File Photo

The result of the presidential election caught many by surprise – especially pollsters, political scientists and journalists. Republican Donald Trump’s victory in key states earned him enough electoral votes to become the nation’s next president. But Democrat Hillary Clinton secured the popular vote.

And that led many of you to write to us at knkx, with questions about the Electoral College and how it works.

We put some of those questions to Robin Jacobson, associate professor of politics and government at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma.

More voters cast a ballot than ever before in this month's election in Oregon. The Oregon Secretary of State's office announced Thursday that 2,022,384 voters took part.

According to numbers released Monday by the Oregon Secretary of State's office, about 42 percent of people who were automatically registered to vote this year did so in this month's election.

Will James / KNKX

Thousands of students walked out of Seattle high schools Monday in a show of anger at the election of Donald Trump.

Several hundred gathered for an afternoon rally on the sports fields of Capitol Hill's Cal Anderson Park. Many said they wanted to show solidarity with groups they feared would be marginalized during a Trump administration, including people of color, immigrants, Muslims, and members of the LGBTQ community. 

Garfield High School student Daniela Castillo, 18, wore the flag of her native Mexico around her shoulders.

Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP Photo

It’s been four years since recreational marijuana became legal in Washington.  With the November election, four more states have jumped on board:  California, Nevada, Maine, and Massachusetts. And now, these states are looking for advice.

This was an industry that needed to be built from scratch. And Washington -- along with Colorado -- is an early adopter when it comes to legal pot.

A Portland, Ore., demonstration against President-elect Donald Trump included a group of people who engaged in "criminal and dangerous behavior," authorities say, leading police to declare the Thursday night gathering a riot.

Some protesters smashed windows, lit a dumpster on fire, threw objects at police and lit firecrackers, according to The Associated Press.

Police say they responded with non-lethal munitions fired into the crowd, and that 26 people were arrested. The AP has more from the scene:

Alternative energy and the companies that support it are here to stay, despite the changing politics in the other Washington. That was the sentiment as the state’s CleanTech Alliance held its annual meeting in Seattle.

The group, which lobbies on behalf of the sector, is getting ready to celebrate ten years since its founding. And over the last six years, the organization has grown from just 35 members in 2010.  

“And now we’re just about 300. So almost 10-time factor of growth,” said CleanTech Alliance President and CEO Tom Ranken.

Will James / knkx

Dozens of Republicans rose to their feet with a scream. Donald Trump's victory was unfolding on giant screens beaming Fox News into a Bellevue ballroom.

At a Democratic gathering across Lake Washington, news of Hillary Clinton's concession scrolled across a TV with CNN on mute. Stragglers at the hotel bar moaned, cursed, cried out in disbelief.

"She was supposed to win," said Brittany Silvas, a Clinton supporter from Seattle.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

Republican Secretary of State Kim Wyman has been re-elected to a second term.

Wyman previously served as the Thurston County auditor and the county's elections director. She defeated Democrat Tina Podlodowski, a former Microsoft manager, served on the Seattle City Council for one four-year term in the 1990s and was an adviser to current Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in 2014.

Wyman narrowly won her election four years ago and voting in August's "top two" primary was tight, with Wyman getting 48 percent of the vote and Podlodowski receiving 46 percent.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

Hundreds of people have taken to downtown Seattle streets to protest the election of Republican Donald Trump to the White House.

The group, organized by Socialist Alternative Seattle, listened to speakers Wednesday afternoon before marching through the streets.

Many held anti-Trump and Black Lives Matter signs and chanted slogans, including "Misogyny has to go," and "The people united, will never be defeated."

They continued marching through Seattle streets during the evening commute.

If there was a “Trump effect” in Washington state, it showed up in four mostly rural western Washington counties. Mason, Grays Harbor, Pacific and Cowlitz counties went for President Obama in 2012. But Donald Trump managed to flip them.

Washington voters gave an overwhelming thumbs down Tuesday to a citizen initiative to impose a direct tax on carbon emissions. But that doesn't look to be the end of the story on regulating global warming pollution at the state level.

Wednesday many people who were “with” Hillary Clinton are talking in hushed conversations over cube walls and giving each other hugs. Some had trouble keeping their focus, like one college senior in Richland, Washington. The 23-year-old is a U.S. citizen, born in eastern Oregon. But says she grew up in fear of her mother being deported because she is an undocumented immigrant from Mexico.

Robert Cohen / St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP, Pool

Advocates for equal rights and gender equity are among those most concerned about the victory of President-elect Donald Trump.

Lisa Stone is executive director of Legal Voice, a non-profit that advocates for women and LGBTQ people throughout the Northwest. The morning after the election, she called an impromptu staff meeting.

“So that people could express how they felt and what they thought and what the feared and what they hoped. And so we did,” she said. “And there was a lot of crying and a little bit of laughing and an enormous amount of resolve.”  

Pages