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Dakota Access oil pipeline

A Norwegian fund that manages government employees' pensions has decided to remove its investments from the companies behind the Dakota Access Pipeline, a move that was reportedly inspired by pressure from Norway's indigenous Sami peoples.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

Hundreds of anti-pipeline demonstrators chanted and waved signs outside of Seattle’s City Hall early Wednesday, before dozens crowded in to council chambers to testify in front of Seattle’s Finance Committee.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo / file

Though the Dakota Access Pipeline is more than a thousand miles away, many voices in the fight against it are local — and not just the protestors in the streets.    

A Seattle lawyer is representing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe: Jan Hasselman, with Earth Justice says they will push back against President Trump’s order to push the pipeline through.  

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Hundreds showed up Tuesday night for a rally in Seattle’s Westlake Park. They were there to show frustration over President Donald Trump’s executive action giving a green light to the controversial Dakota Access pipeline. Many of the protesters were chanting "We can't drink oil; leave it in the soil."

 

Reana Anderson was among the hundreds who gathered. She's native Hawaiian and says it's important to her to protect tribal rights and the environment.

 

The Trump administration is pushing forward with plans for two major oil pipelines in the U.S., projects that sparked nationwide demonstrations and legal fights under President Barack Obama.

President Trump on Tuesday gave the go-ahead for construction of two controversial oil pipelines, the Keystone XL and the Dakota Access.

As he signed the paperwork in an Oval Office photo op, Trump said his administration is "going to renegotiate some of the terms" of the Keystone project, which would carry crude oil from the tar sands of western Canada and connect to an existing pipeline to the Gulf Coast.

Andy Clayton-King / AP Photo

A coalition of activists will gather at the federal building in Seattle Thursday afternoon to demonstrate against the Dakota Access Pipeline. They’re calling on the public to join them in defunding the project by closing accounts at Wells Fargo Bank. 

The protestors say they’ll start the action across the street from the federal building at the Wells Fargo Center, where a large number of them will close their accounts and lodge complaints. That will be followed by speeches, singing and drumming from Native American activists and leaders. 

For months, the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and others in North Dakota mounted a massive protest against the controversial Dakota Access pipeline, in part over concerns that any leak could contaminate their drinking water.

JAMES MACPHERSON / AP PHOTO

Seattle leaders are considering cutting ties, at least temporarily, with a bank financing the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Wells Fargo manages $3 billion of the city's operating funds under a contract that began in 2013 and is set to expire at the end of 2018. The bank says it is also one of 17 institutions providing loans for the oil pipeline through the Midwest.

The sun was shining on opponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline on Sunday, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that it would not approve the final and key part of the controversial project. Less than 24 hours later, many of those people were huddling in shelters or trying to escape the rural camp as a brutal winter storm bore down on them.

Cars slid off roads and tents were blown over as winds gusted to more than 50 mph, causing near white-out conditions on the short stretch of highway between the protesters' camp and the small town of Cannon Ball, N.D.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Native American tribes and environmentalists all over the U.S. have been celebrating the decision by the Army Corps of Engineers not to grant an easement for completion of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Several from the Pacific Northwest are viewing it as a victory, not just for the Standing Rock Sioux, but for the power of tribal treaty rights in general.

Brian Cladoosby is chairman of the Swinomish Tribe in La Conner and president of the National Congress of American Indians. He says the Army Corps of Engineers did the right thing in what he calls a historic decision.

The Army Corps of Engineers has denied a permit for the construction of a key section of the Dakota Access Pipeline, granting a major victory to protesters who have been demonstrating for months.

The decision essentially halts the construction of the 1,172-mile oil pipeline just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Thousands of demonstrators from across the country had flocked to North Dakota in protest.

Several thousand Native Americans and their supporters continued to camp out near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota on Thanksgiving Day.

Citizens of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation set up the Sacred Stone Camp in April to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline, which they say would threaten nearby burial sites and the Sioux water supply.

A woman protesting the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline who was wounded earlier this week might lose her arm as a result of the injury, her family says. Sophia Wilansky's injury is the most gruesome to date of the months-long standoff at Standing Rock, N.D.

"The doctor just said she may need as many as 20 surgeries over very many months to have any hope of saving her arm and her hand," Wilansky's father, Wayne Wilansky, told a group of reporters outside a Minneapolis hospital.

As resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline in Standing Rock, N.D., concludes its seventh month, two narratives have emerged:

  1. We have never seen anything like this before.
  2. This has been happening for hundreds of years.

Both are true. The scope of the resistance at Standing Rock exceeds just about every protest in Native American history. But that history itself, of indigenous people fighting to protect not just their land, but the land, is centuries old.

Police and demonstrators opposed to the Dakota Access Pipeline clashed overnight on a bridge that has been a flashpoint in the ongoing protests.

"Police say protesters set fires in the area Sunday night and threw rocks at officers," Prairie Public Broadcasting's Amy Sisk reported. But an activist said in a live-stream video that projectiles fired from the police side started the fires and that demonstrators, who call themselves water protectors, were trying to extinguish the flames.

Activists engaged in a national "day of action" Tuesday to protest the controversial Dakota Access oil pipeline. Native American groups' opposition to the project has gotten a lot of attention recently, but it's just one of many pipeline battles going on across the country.

John L. Mone / AP Photo

Activists are gearing up for a national day of action Tuesday against the Dakota Access Pipeline. More than 200 protests are planned, with seven communities in the Puget Sound region taking part.

The action was planned before an announcement late yesterday that the Army Corps of Engineers has suspended work on the project while it looks into tribal concerns.

Police used pepper spray and what they called nonlethal ammunition to remove Dakota Access Pipeline protesters from federal land Wednesday. Demonstrators say they were trying to occupy land just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation where construction of the controversial pipeline is scheduled.

More than 1 million people have "checked in" on Facebook to the Standing Rock Indian Reservation page, in a show of support for the tribe that has been rallying against construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

James MacPherson / AP Photo

In North Dakota, tension over the 1,200-mile Dakota Access oil pipeline is escalating. Police and National Guard troops arrested more than 140 protesters near a construction site Thursday.

Law officers ousted the protesters in an operation that involved the use of shotgun beanbag rounds and pepper spray. The protesters had set up camp last weekend on the land owned by the pipeline developer to try to block the project.

Police have removed protesters from land owned by pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners in North Dakota.

At least 117 people were arrested, according to The Associated Press. News reports say officers used pepper spray against protesters, but no serious injuries were reported.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP Photo

American Indian tribes in Washington state are asking President Barack Obama to overhaul the way the federal government consults with tribes on infrastructure projects.

Leaders of four tribes are meeting with federal officials in Seattle Tuesday.

The Yakama Nation, Lummi Nation, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community and Spokane Tribe are supporting a plan they say will improve the consultation process, protect sacred sites and provide greater recognition of tribal rights.

Amy Goodman — the host of the left-leaning Democracy Now news program — will not face criminal charges for her coverage of an oil pipeline protest in North Dakota last month. At least not for now; prosecutors say they may still bring charges later.

On Sept. 3, Goodman and her crew captured images of security teams with dogs trying to keep protesters from entering a pipeline construction site. She wanted to know whether security members were "telling the dogs to bite the protesters?"

James MacPherson / AP Photo

Northwest tribes continue to show support for the Standing Rock Sioux Indians and their opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline. Over the weekend, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville delivered hand-smoked salmon and firewood to North Dakota.

Michael Marchand is the Chairman of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. He says tribal leadership asked three women from the reservation to deliver 500 salmon they smoked by hand to North Dakota. He says tribal members from the across the region are “shuttling back and forth.”

The Camp of the Sacred Stone is full of all manner of people — kids, elders, lawyers, laid-back hippies, and representatives of several Native American tribes — all gathered alongside the Standing Rock Sioux Nation to resist construction of a controversial oil pipeline that would cut across the American heartland.

Construction on the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline is allowed to proceed, except in one area in North Dakota of particular sensitivity to a Native American tribe.

That's the result of two separate developments Friday — a federal court decision, and a statement by three federal agencies.

A federal judge has granted part of a Native American tribe's emergency request to halt construction of a section of oil pipeline in North Dakota.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it does not oppose the temporary halt of construction on the Dakota Access Pipeline, a $3.8 billion oil pipeline slated to run through four states, including North Dakota.

As we've reported, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe opposes the pipeline because it fears it could disturb sacred sites and affect the drinking water.

Members of eight Washington tribes took lessons they learned last spring with them to North Dakota last week, where the Standing Rock Sioux are opposing the construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline.