Asian giant hornet | KNKX

Asian giant hornet

Washington State Department of Agriculture entomologist Chris Looney displays a dead Asian giant hornet, bottom, next to a native bald-faced hornet. The Asian hornets are deadly to honeybees, but bug experts say they’re not a big threat to people.
Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press file

Officials in Canada and the United States are coordinating efforts to detect and eradicate the Asian giant hornet. 

In this Oct. 24, 2020, photo, a Washington state Department of Agriculture worker holds two of the dozens of Asian giant hornets vacuumed from a tree in Blaine.
Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press file

Wildlife officials in Washington state have said British Columbia and U.S. federal and state agencies will work together to track, trap and eradicate Asian giant hornets in the Pacific Northwest.

Destruction of murder hornets nest doesn't end threat

Nov 10, 2020
Wearing a protective suit, Washington State Department of Agriculture entomologist Chris Looney fills a tree cavity with carbon dioxide after vacuuming a nest of Asian giant hornets from inside it Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020, in Blaine, Wash.
Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — When scientists in Washington state destroyed the first nest of so-called murder hornets found in the U.S., they discovered about 500 live specimens in various stages of development, officials said Tuesday.

Sven Spichiger, Washington State Department of Agriculture managing entomologist, displays a canister of Asian giant hornets vacuumed from a nest in a tree behind him Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020, in Blaine, Wash.
Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Workers from the state Department of Agriculture managed to destroy the first nest of so-called murder hornets discovered in the U.S. without suffering any stings or other injuries, the agency said Monday.

Washington state discovers first 'murder hornet' nest in U.S.

Oct 23, 2020
In this Oct. 7, 2020, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a live Asian giant hornet with a tracking device affixed to it sits on an apple in a tree where it was placed, near Blaine, Wash.
Karla Salp/Washington State Department of Agriculture / The Associated Press

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Scientists have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials in Washington state said.

Washington State's Department of Agriculture this week for the first time radio tagged a live Asian giant hornet. Unfortunately, the tag fell off before the glue dried.
Washington State Department of Agriculture

It’s been a busy week for Washington state agriculture officials tracking the potential spread of the Asian giant hornet. Scientists say they found evidence of six new hornets near Blaine, indicating the likelihood that a nest is in the area.  

The invasive species, sometimes called murder hornets, can decimate honeybees and other pollinators, threatening ecosystems and agriculture. Fifteen of them have now been found in Washington since they were first seen here last year.

In this April 23, 2020, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a researcher holds a dead Asian giant hornet in Blaine, Wash.
Karla Salp / Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP

WASHINGTON STATE (AP) — Insect experts say people should calm down about the big bug with the nickname "murder hornet" — unless you are a beekeeper or a honeybee.

The Asian giant hornets found in Washington state that grabbed headlines this week aren't big killers of humans, although it does happen on rare occasions. But the world's largest hornets do decapitate entire hives of honeybees, and that crucial food pollinator is already in big trouble.