An indie-rock essay on dementia from Seattle-based band, 'Great Grandpa' | KNKX

An indie-rock essay on dementia from Seattle-based band, 'Great Grandpa'

Nov 16, 2019

 


 

The sheer physicality of aging and dying are things we try not to think about, so it’s especially striking when these subjects turn up in unexpected places — say, your indie rock playlist. 

Carrie Goodwin plays bass for the Seattle-based band Great Grandpa, and she also happens to be a nursing student. In her song “Rosalie,” Goodwin introduces us to someone losing her grip on life — and maybe gets us a little closer to wrapping our brains around our common fate. 

She caught up with Sound Effect contributor Allie Ferguson to dissect the song, and talk about the intersection of nursing and art. 

(The lyrics of Great Grandpa’s “Rosalie”)

The path in her brain gets rewarded again

Where it hardens and strengthens in a looping refrain

And masked spectres of the past reveal themselves against her will

To slide in this moment, alive again pro tem

 

There’s an endless expanding drawn in the eyes

A soul decomposing, a body alive

 

Rosalie lives, lives on her own

Scared like a german shepherd, in the back of the yard

Wait til morning, cares coming by

Changing her clothes, listening to

 

Odd things, throw the cereal on the ceiling

Stretched screams, shallow skin, swollen feet

 

Rosalie lives, lives with her own

Home like a TV sitcom, and her kids in the car

Wait til nighttime, see her again, hollow and thin

Wading through

 

Odd things, throw the cereal on the ceiling

Stretched screams, swollen speech, void of meaning

Sad scenes can be beared, can be handled

No thing keeps me up, keeps us screaming

 

It’s the hardest part, the hardest part

Just a relentless regress