Krishnadev Calamur | KNKX

Krishnadev Calamur

Krishnadev Calamur is NPR's deputy Washington editor. In this role, he helps oversee planning of the Washington desk's news coverage. He also edits NPR's Supreme Court coverage. Previously, Calamur was an editor and staff writer at The Atlantic. This is his second stint at NPR, having previously worked on NPR's website from 2008-15. Calamur received an M.A. in journalism from the University of Missouri.

Update at 9:00 a.m.

Darren Wilson, the police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown, told a grand jury in September that the 18-year-old hit him in the face with a fist following an exchange between them on Aug. 9 in Ferguson, Mo.

The grand jury on Monday declined to charge Wilson, who is white, in the killing of Brown, who was black.

Updated at 5:00 p.m.

Attorneys for the family of Michael Brown, the 18-year-old who was shot and killed by Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson, said they had expected Monday's outcome in which a grand jury declined to charge the officer in the fatal shooting.

"We could see what the outcome was going to be, and that is what occurred last night," attorney Benjamin Crump said at a news conference in St. Louis Tuesday.

He said the fact that Wilson was not indicted shows the system is broken.

Israel's Cabinet approved a draft law on Sunday that defines the country as "the nation-state of the Jewish people." The move has angered not only Israel's Arab citizens, but also some members of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition government.

NPR's Emily Harris is reporting on the measure, which must still be approved by Israel's Parliament. Here's what she told our Newscast unit:

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his Iranian counterpart, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, added another meeting today in Vienna in the push toward an agreement on Iran's nuclear program.

Iranian news reports had earlier said Zarif was returning to Tehran for further instructions. And Kerry had been scheduled to leave Vienna for Paris – something he could still do while talks continue — before adding the late Friday meeting.

The Texas State Board of Education has voted to approve the use of 89 history and social studies books across the state.

The 10-5 vote in the Republican-controlled panel was along party lines. The Texas Tribune has more:

Martial law in Thailand will remain in place "indefinitely," the country's justice minister told Reuters in an interview nearly six months after the military overthrew the government of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson, who was found guilty of conspiracy to hack personal voice mails, was released today after serving less than five months of his 18-month sentence.

British news reports say that as a condition of early release, Coulson, 46, will have to wear an electronic tag for the remainder of his sentence.

London Mayor Boris Johnson owes the IRS money — and he's not going to pay it.

Johnson, who was born in the U.S. and lived here until he was 5 years old, holds dual U.S.-U.K. citizenship.

At issue, he told NPR member station WAMU's Diane Rehm Show in an interview, was capital gains on the sale of his first residence, a sum that is not taxable in Britain.

Soccer's governing body said today it will further review the bidding process for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, reopening for scrutiny the mechanism by which Russia and Qatar were awarded the tournaments.

The executive in charge of quality for Takata Corp. apologized today for the defects in the air bags made by his company that have been linked to at least five deaths and dozens of injuries.

"We are deeply sorry about each of the reported instances in which a Takata air bag has not performed as designed and the driver or passenger had suffered personal injuries or death," Hiroshi Shimizu, senior vice president of quality for Takata, told the Senate Commerce Committee.

Spain's richest woman, the Duchess of Alba, has died at the age of 88 in Seville.

Maria del Rosario Cayetana Fitz-James Stuart had more titles than any other aristocrat in the world. Her parents gave her several names, but she preferred Cayetana.

The BBC adds:

A human rights group is calling on Indonesia to scrap "virginity tests" given to female police recruits.

The parents of Peter Kassig, the American aid worker who was killed by the Islamic State militant group, said his life was evidence that "one person can make a difference."

In a brief statement Monday, Paula and Ed Kassig remembered their 26-year-old son, who was seized in October 2013, as both a realist and an idealist.

Preserved human parts — including an infant's head, a baby's foot and an adult heart — stolen from a medical museum in Thailand last month were discovered over the weekend in three boxes labeled as toys that were being shipped to Las Vegas.

Workers at DHL discovered five body parts when they X-rayed the boxes, then alerted the Thai police. They identified the man who shipped the boxes as Ryan McPherson, a 31-year-old American tourist, and questioned him and another American, Daniel Tanner, 33, about the packages.

The director of a pharmaceutical company that Indian authorities say supplied medicines for the mass sterilizations that left 13 women dead was arrested today, and the drugs manufactured by his company banned.

The Indian doctor at the center of botched sterilizations that have led to at least 13 deaths has performed more than 50,000 similar operations during his career.

Newly revealed emails seen by The Wall Street Journal and other news organizations appear to show that automaker General Motors ordered a half-million replacement ignition switches nearly two months before it alerted regulators to a defect in the switches that has since been linked to 32 deaths.

Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton has the background for our Newscast unit. Here's what she says:

Residents of Denton, Texas, voted Tuesday to ban hydraulic fracturing in the city.

According to unofficial results posted on the city's website, 58.64 percent of voters supported banning the controversial drilling method that is also called fracking; 41.36 percent voted against the proposition. It's the first time a city in the energy-friendly state has voted to ban fracking.

The vote is expected to be challenged, but Mayor Chris Watts said he would defend the ban.

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy has temporarily blocked Tuesday's appeals court decision that struck down bans on same-sex marriage in Idaho and Nevada.

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