Kevin Kniestedt | KNKX

Kevin Kniestedt

Sound Effect Producer

Kevin began his career at KNKX in 2003, where his first responsibility was to eradicate the KNKX Jazz Library from all Smooth Jazz CD’s. Since then there is not much at KNKX he hasn’t done. Kevin has worked as a full time jazz host, news host, and has hosted, at least once, almost every single program on KNKX. Kevin currently produces 88.5's weekly show Sound Effect. Kevin has conducted or produced hundreds of interviews, has won local and national awards for newscasts and commentary, and helped make the KNKX Grocery Tote famous.

Kevin's most memorable KNKX radio moment was his interview with Edgar Martinez right before his last home game. Kevin lives the seemingly never-ending bachelor life in Seattle, where you may find him hitting a tennis ball, catching an independent film or eating a massive plate of nachos.

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This story originally aired on January 6, 2018.  

Everybody loves a good mystery ... some of us more than others. So when Tom DesLongchamp discovered an unusual looking cassette tape in a bargain bin, and discovered a collection of unidentifiable disco songs on one side of it, his curiosity was aroused. That curiosity soon transformed into a fixation, or maybe even an obsession. 

Michael Pollack/Flickr

This show originally aired on January 6, 2018 

In this June 28, 2016 file photo, members of the Rainbow Family of Living Light gather under a tarp at their campsite in Mount Tabor, Vermont.
Wilson Ring / AP file

A woman from a conservative background decides to leave that world and join the Rainbow Family. Then, a woman becomes excommunicated from her family for marrying outside of her religion. Also, a woman reunites with her daycare caretaker, but this time in a completely different type of environment.

Courtesy Mary McIntyre

Mary McIntyre was rasied in Bellevue in a conservative Christian home, and attended a conservative Christian school. There was no shortage of rules and expectations. While Mary loved her family, something was always telling her when she was growing up that this wasn't exactly the life for her.

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We head to Scarecrow Video, where competing against streaming media is a matter of survival. An over-50 women’s champion basketball team finds that losing can be more sweet than winning. Then the story of a man who ran Wyatt Earp out of town, shot the chief of police, and then went straight. Finally, the cutthroat world of pumpkin-growing competitions.

By Thomas R. Conlon - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0

So, just in case you haven’t spent a lot of time in the Seattle of the late 1800s, I can tell you it was a very different city.

Credit Parker Miles Blohm

It's our annual Thanksgiving week tradition, when we share our favorite music stories from the past year. 

KNKX

We meet a woman who combines tap dancing with social justice. A pediatric oncologist shares his story of being pulled out of his comfort zone. And a woman talks about how she chose to shout her diagnosis from the rooftops, only to find out later that she was misdiagnosed.

In her early 20s, Ginny McClure got some bad news. It was the kind of news people tend to be embarrassed to share. Ginny resolved to not be ashamed — to shout it from the rooftops, even.

Still, there are certain subjects you don’t really want to talk about with certain people, like your parents. For Ginny, that subject was sex.

Credit Andrew Skudder/Flickr

KNKX reporter Will James reflects on the closing of the Merkle Hotel, what may be the last remaining low-income residential hotel in Tacoma. Professor Marie Wong gives a history of single room occupancy hotels in the Chinatown International District in Seattle. An elected official talks about how she still uses food banks. We then visit a bicycle-based needle exchange program in Olympia.

Courtesy Marie Wong

Residential hotels once filled a crucial niche for low-income workers and immigrants, a bridge between affordable housing and a shelter.

These Single Room Occupancy hotels, or SROs, used to dominate the streetscape in Seattle’s Chinatown-International District. Now they’re nearly extinct.

It’s a story that caught the attention of Marie Wong, an Associate Professor at Seattle University. It appealed to her background in urban planning, but also to her background as a Chinese American growing up in the Midwest.

(AP Photo/John Froschauer)

There were rumors earlier this week that the Mariners might be looking to strip down their team and trade some of their more talented players during the offseason in an effort to acquire prospects for the future. The first sign that this might be the case came this week, when the M’s traded away catcher Mike Zunino. KNKX sports commentator Art Thiel told producer Kevin Kniestedt that virtually everyone, including closer Edwin Diaz and ace pitcher James Paxton, could be traded for the right price.

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This story originally aired on December 16, 2017.

To say that Washington State University Cougars have school spirit is a wild understatement, and if you have any in your life, you know they don't hesitate to remind you.

Now, Cameron McCoy and many other members of Coug nation have reached a significant milestone in letting their flags fly. 

Actual flags. 

TRAJANER/CREATIVE COMMONS

This episode originally aired on December 16, 2017.

This week on Sound Effect, our theme is "One of Many" ... the tension between standing out and fitting in.

AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton

This story originally aired on December 16, 2017.

Sound Effect producer Kevin Kniestedt shared this essay.   

My earliest memory of watching the Seahawks goes back to when I was probably three or four. I remember sitting in the basement with my dad, with the game on TV, and hearing the announcer saying “there is a penalty flag down.” Since I had no understanding of the game, I imagined that somewhere in that stadium, there was a person standing by a flag pole, lowering and raising a flag that said “penalty” on it every time a player did something bad.

Credit Gabriel Spitzer

This story originally aired on November 4, 2017.

The population of Concrete, Washington in 1938 was about 1,000 people. But one October evening that year, while a famous radio broadcast was frightening a good portion of the population across the country, things in Concrete got even stranger.

A violinist with the Seattle Symphony talks about having perfect pitch, and offers a demonstration. A University of Washington gymnastics coach discusses the constant pressure for elite gymnasts to be perfect. A Seattle photographer takes us out to try and find the perfect shot.

Credit Parker Miles Blohm

If you are a musician in the Seattle Symphony, you already have a certain mastery of your craft. Andy Liang is in the second violin section with the Symphony, and despite being an incredible talent, he would probably be the first to tell you that he is not perfect. But he does possess at least one type of perfection: perfect pitch.

Gisela Giardino/Flickr ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)

A psychology professor explains how dreams can have a big impact on real-life decisions and discoveries. A researcher searches for a drug that can help veterans kick their PTSD nightmares. A man who used to make teeth transitions into a new career, in dream analysis.

This Danish tooth-maker became a dream therapist, at the urging of his Jewish Unitarian minister wife. As one does.

OK, better back up. For Flemming Behrend, his career as a dental technician was something that he loved. He hand-made artificial and prosthetic teeth, shaping porcelin and pigments into lifelike choppers. He appreciated the art of it, and the satisfaction that came from delighting his patients. 

Credit Parker Miles Blohm

This week, stories of the unusual things we can’t get enough of. We meet a scientist who is also widely recognized as an artist who paints cats. A musician from Yugoslavia talks about making art during war time. A man makes a one person stand against those who think vaccinations are bad.

To say Joe Petosa Jr. and his family are into accordions would not be doing them justice. The Petosa Accordion company goes back almost 100 years, when Carlo Petosa started hand crafting accordions in his Seattle basement. That tradition was passed down to Carlos’s son, Joe Petosa, then to his grandson, Joe Jr., and now onto his great grandson, Joe the third. The custom instruments they make are sought after all over the world.

(U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO BY SENIOR AIRMAN PATRICK S. CICCARONE/RELEASED

 

This show originally aired on December 9, 2017.

Courtesy Simone Alicea

This story originally aired on December 9, 2017.   

Meet a mother and a daughter working through how blood and language have shaped their relationship.

Simone Alicea is a reporter and editor here at KNKX. Her mom Veronica Alicea-Galvan is a King County Superior Court judge. They came together in a Storycorps booth in Chicago to talk about something specific: the bilingual court that Judge Alicea-Galvan used to run in Des Moines, Washington.

peasap / Flickr

This week's episode of Sound Effect contains adult language that, while "bleeped," may not be suitable for all audiences.

Chelon Lone Photography

 This story originally aired on May 7, 2016. 

Being involved in a startup can be exhausting, expensive, stressful and risky. As a result, the people involved in such ventures can often be found taking their work, and themselves, pretty seriously.

Bridget Quigg is a Seattle writer who has worked in the tech world for a decade.  She recently completed the run of her one-woman show "Techlandia," which skewers startup culture — with love. 

(Credit Gabriel Spitzer)

This story originally aired on May 28, 2016.

Kristi Hamilton had hit rock bottom. After the passing of her mother, repossession of her house, and a long stretch of severe drug and alcohol abuse, she found herself homeless. She found herself sleeping anywhere she could — a friend's house, her car, shelters, or behind a grocery store. But between a renewed faith and winning what is the equivalent of a lottery ticket if you are homeless, Hamilton pulled herself out of the darkness, and returned to a life filled with sobriety and a roof over her head.

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This week, stories of childhood mischief. First, host Gabriel Spitzer shares some mischief from his childhood, when he took some poetic liberties during the morning announcements in middle school. Next, a woman talks about a mathematical discovery she made in third grade, and how it likely kept her from working hard in her education from then on.

In 1931 in the small southeast Washington town of Asotin, a 12 year old boy named Herbert Nicholls Jr. shot and killed the town sheriff. 

Nicholls was starving and abused, and had run away from home and broken into the local store to steal some food. The sheriff came in to find him, and Nicholls fired the gun with the intent to scare him away. Unfortunately, the bullet hit the sheriff in the head, killing him instantly. 

Credit Rob Hurson/Flickr

This week, stories of speaking out, even when it would have been easier to keep quiet. First, a climate scientist talks about her experience speaking out about sexual harassment and assault in field. Next, a doctor shares what he learned about interacting with the assertive parents of patients.

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