Kevin Kniestedt | KNKX

Kevin Kniestedt

Sound Effect Producer

Kevin began his career at KNKX in 2003, where his first responsibility was to eradicate the KNKX Jazz Library from all Smooth Jazz CD’s. Since then there is not much at KNKX he hasn’t done. Kevin has worked as a full time jazz host, news host, and has hosted, at least once, almost every single program on KNKX. Kevin currently produces 88.5's weekly show Sound Effect. Kevin has conducted or produced hundreds of interviews, has won local and national awards for newscasts and commentary, and helped make the KNKX Grocery Tote famous.

Kevin's most memorable KNKX radio moment was his interview with Edgar Martinez right before his last home game. Kevin lives the seemingly never-ending bachelor life in Seattle, where you may find him hitting a tennis ball, catching an independent film or eating a massive plate of nachos.

Ways to Connect

We begin in the last large-animal farm within the city of Seattle, atop a chestnut mare named Star, as host Gabriel Spitzer gets a ride and a history lesson. Then we hear how a couple of sophisticated urban poodles became the talk of the town in rural central Washington.

Cindy Healy (right) stands with friend and fellow engineer Becky Manning Mitties in the NASA clean room.
Courtesy of Cindy Healy

It may have not completely hit Cindy Healy, a former NASA engineer, until she was sitting in the theater watching the Matt Damon movie, "The Martian." 

"And I'm trying hard to suppress an audible sob because I know I am the only one crying at this part of the movie," she said. "And I'm just wiping away tears and my son looks at me like I'm crazy. And I lean over to him and I whisper 'that's my spacecraft.'"

Cindy was just one of a few hundred people who helped put the Pathfinder spacecraft on Mars in real life. But that did not come without its challenges. 

Kimya Dawson
Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

We’ve all said or written stuff we regret. If you’re a musician, once your music is out there it’s hard to undo. Seattle-based songwriter Kimya Dawson has had a long career, and when she looks back on some of her own lyrics, she cringes a little.

Back then, she used some words in her songs that she would never say today. So how do you take it back? Kimya reflects on the evolution in a conversation with Sound Effect host Gabriel Spitzer.

JAMES CRIDLAND/FLICKR

 

This show originally aired on March 31, 2018.

You won't find a colony of alligators in a sewer like this one. It would be "a completely inhospitable environment in the first place," says Snopes.com founder David Mikkelson.
Sean Havey / The Associated Press

No, Thomas Crapper didn’t invent the modern flushing toilet. Airplanes don’t directly dump “blue ice” and human waste from 30,000 feet. And alligators can’t thrive in a New York City sewer.

These are some of the abundant toilet myths that have circulated across the internet and beyond.

Justin Steyer / KNKX

Mac Rebennack, better known as Dr. John, died Thursday at 77. The pianist and singer brought the sound of New Orleans to the world and is being remembered by many as a genius and a gentleman.

Dr. John came to our studios in 2010 to play tunes from his album "Tribal" and sat down for an interview with KNKX's (then KPLU's) Kevin Kniestedt. Kevin joined Morning Edition host Kirsten Kendrick to talk about what made Dr. John so special. 

This photo was taken at a rodeo in Hobbs, New Mexico, where rodeo clown J.J. Harrison fell down in front of a 2,000-pound, charging bull. "I remember thinking this could be the end," he said.
Courtesy of J.J. Harrison

When J.J. Harrison fell down in front of a charging, 2,000-pound bull in Hobbs, New Mexico, everything seemed to slow down.  

"I just remember thinking this could be the end," he said.

It wasn't. And even though Harrison was pretty beat up that day, he was back at it almost immediately. "I got my check and I drove five hours to get to the airport," he said, "because I've got to keep going."

Laura Michalek passing the previous winner in the 1979 Chicago Marathon.
Courtesy of Laura Michalek

Laura Michalek is an auctioneer. She lives in Tacoma and does mostly fundraising work, and she’s been at it for a couple of decades.

But this story is about one of the first times Laura was in the spotlight, and it actually comes way before her auctioneer career.

This all starts in the year 1979. Laura’s in high school in Berwyn, Illinois — just outside Chicago. And she’s running on the cross-country team.

NATIONAL PHOTO AGENCY OF ISRAEL

This show originally aired on April 28, 2018. 

Courtesy Ben Weber

This story originally aired on April 28, 2018.

Actor Ben Weber has been in movies like Kissing Jessica Stein and television shows like Sex and the City. Most recently he was in a television mini-series called Manhunt: Unabomber. But he also got some attention a few years ago for a video he did starring Ben Weber as Angry Ben Weber.

Credit Carl Badgley

This story originally aired on April 28, 2018.   

Former Seattleite Carl Badgley has some experience with emergencies, having been an army medic and a 9-1-1 operator. But, in search of a simpler, slightly less intense lifestyle, he had moved to be near the beautiful tropical waters off of Kona, Hawaii.

CREDIT JUSTIN C./YELP

 

This show originally aired on April 21, 2018.

Credit Clint Lanier and Derek Hembree

This story originally aired on April 21, 2018.    

One of the realities about bars, like many other businesses, is that at some point, they will probably close their doors for good. This was the case in December of 2015, when a Pioneer Square bar called the Double Header called “last call” for the last time. This is significant, because the Double Header was one of the oldest, if not the oldest, gay bar in America.

Kyle MacKenzie/Flickr

First, two KNKX moms share their experiences in the neonatal intensive care unit after the birth of their children. Then, a trip to a NICU, where we learn how to write lullabies.

virtual reality
Raphael Satter / The Associated Press

We start by meeting a scientist who is trying to create a way for people to have the sensation of touch through their prosthetic limbs. Then, a man considers himself “lucky” after having his legs amputated.

Credit Hanna Brooks Olsen

When you revise history, it can go either way: You can nudge the story a little further away from the truth, or you can correct the mistakes in and omissions from the historical record. On today's show, we have a bit of both. 

BY CHRIS VLACHOS (OWN WORK) [CC BY 3.0 (HTTP://CREATIVECOMMONS.ORG/LICENSES/BY/3.0)], VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

This week on Sound Effect, we share stories some of areas that can be unclear from time to time. We start by talking to a former Seattle resident who moved to a sister city in Ireland where the weather is also gray. Next, we talk to a reporter and a retired judge about an article that was written about the judge’s ruling that let a sex offender go.

two sons of Sound Effect host Gabriel Spitzer
Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

We start by hearing from host Gabriel Spitzer's sons, who talk about the challenges and empathy that come with being older and younger brothers. Then, a woman shares experiences and lessons learned from her older brother, who has bipolar disorder. Next, a woman makes a career out of helping kids who have Down syndrome. Finally, a young man finds a journal his brother kept in middle school, and writes a poem for him.  

PARKER MILES BLOHM / KNKX

Xolie Morra Cogley is a musician in Seattle, and leader of the band Xolie Morra and the Strange Kind.

“I’ve always been into music since I was very little," Cogley says. "And so music, I think, really helped to move me in a more social direction, because I didn’t really do a lot of talking when I was little. But I developed a communication skill using music that helped me fit into certain groups. So I didn’t have to have conversations. I was just playing music.”

Wikipedia Commons/Loozrboy

We start with a man translating traditional blues into Yiddish. Next, we join "the Jane Goodall of the whales," as she eavesdrops on orcas. Then, an effort is made to rethink how an endangered native language should look on the page.

Protesters, including Bryce Green, 12, center, make the raised-fist "Black Power" sign as they take part in a Black Lives Matter protest march, Saturday, April 15, 2017, in Seattle.
Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press (file)

We start with a man who is fighting for better access to sidewalks for people with mobility issues. Next, the story of a man who started the first Black Panther chapter outside of California when he was 17. Then, a couple of activists take on a dictator, and pay the ultimate price.

CREDIT PHILLIP ROBERTSON/FLICKR

 

This episode orignally aired on February 24, 2018.  

COURTESY OF HARBORVIEW MEDICAL CENTER

This story originally aired on June 30, 2018. 

Garry Knight/Flickr

We start with a deeper look at Frog and Toad, and why Frog wanted to be alone. Next, a bus driver thaws the “Seattle Freeze” for a passenger. Then, a woman battles a voice that encourages her to do destructive things. Finally, a marriage is strengthened, even though the couple is separated by iron bars.

Creative Commons Zero — CC0

We start with a woman talking about the value of her father lending a gentle ear and a gentle voice when she was growing up. Next, a son joins his father to take part in a journey that his dad started 43 years earlier. Then, a look inside a book made by prison inmates on McNeil Island for their children, to share what life was like for them. Finally, a man finds his way into the medical profession, but on his own rather than from the pressure of his father.

TRPNBLIES7 / FLICKR

This show originally aired on February 17, 2018. 

Joe McNally

This story originally aired on February 17, 2018.

George Divoky is a scientist in Seattle, at least most of the year. But don’t expect to find him around here during the summertime.

taxrebate.org/uk Flickr

We start with a collection of people telling us about something they spent money on that wasn’t necessary, but was totally worth it. Then, a Seattle author talks about why she chose to pay a lot of money for a 150-square-foot apartment in the city. Also, a man takes a huge inheritance and spends it on building a school halfway across the world.

Courtesy Paul Currington

Paul Currington had more or less given up on the idea of love. Breakups in Paul's adult life had ranged from awkward to heartbreaking, and had taken their emotional and physical tolls on him. 

Then one day, Paul was watching the news, and he saw an interview with a professional cuddler. 

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE PHOTO BY SENIOR AIRMAN ALEXANDRA SANDOVAL

This show originally aired on January 13, 2018.

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