Kevin Kniestedt | KNKX

Kevin Kniestedt

Producer, Sound Effect

Kevin began his career at KNKX in 2003, where his first responsibility was to eradicate the KNKX Jazz Library from all Smooth Jazz CD’s. Since then there is not much at KNKX he hasn’t done. Kevin has worked as a full time jazz host, news host, and has hosted, at least once, almost every single program on KNKX. Kevin currently produces 88.5's weekly show Sound Effect. Kevin has conducted or produced hundreds of interviews, has won local and national awards for newscasts and commentary, and helped make the KNKX Grocery Tote famous.

Kevin's most memorable KNKX radio moment was his interview with Edgar Martinez right before his last home game. Kevin lives the seemingly never-ending bachelor life in Seattle, where you may find him hitting a tennis ball, catching an independent film or eating a massive plate of nachos.

Ways to Connect

TRPNBLIES7 / FLICKR

This show originally aired on February 17, 2018. 

Joe McNally

This story originally aired on February 17, 2018.

George Divoky is a scientist in Seattle, at least most of the year. But don’t expect to find him around here during the summertime.

taxrebate.org/uk Flickr

We start with a collection of people telling us about something they spent money on that wasn’t necessary, but was totally worth it. Then, a Seattle author talks about why she chose to pay a lot of money for a 150-square-foot apartment in the city. Also, a man takes a huge inheritance and spends it on building a school halfway across the world.

Courtesy Paul Currington

Paul Currington had more or less given up on the idea of love. Breakups in Paul's adult life had ranged from awkward to heartbreaking, and had taken their emotional and physical tolls on him. 

Then one day, Paul was watching the news, and he saw an interview with a professional cuddler. 

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE PHOTO BY SENIOR AIRMAN ALEXANDRA SANDOVAL

This show originally aired on January 13, 2018.

Hacker/Flickr

This story originally aired on January 13, 2018.  

In the late 90s and early 2000s, a lot of people were still figuring out this whole internet business.

As is often the case, way out ahead of the learning curve were the cyber-criminals, and law enforcement had some catching up to do.

The FBI often relied on the knowledge of private security professionals. So in 2000, they contacted a Seattle expert named Ray Pompon, and recruited him to go undercover as part of a sting operation. Pompon shared his story with host Gabriel Spitzer.

No machine-readable author provided. JEDIKNIGHT1970 assumed (based on copyright claims). [CC BY-SA 2.5 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

We meet a comedian who lived with an all deaf family, and learned how to do impressions by watching television. Then, a shop teacher reflects on some of his students constructing a casket for a fallen fellow student. Finally, a cab driver shares what it was like to dress like Elvis on the clock.

The Burke Museum in Seattle is using 3D printing to complete skeletons that are millions of years old.
Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

We head to the Burke Museum to see how they are completing 200-million-year-old skeletons with 3D printing. Then, a Congolese refugee talks about her experience in foster care in Tacoma. Next, an unusual stone leads to a personal obsession for a local archaeologist. Finally, a DNA test tells one man something very different about himself.

Christian Sidor, a paleontologist, works with 220-million-year-old bones at the Burke Museum in Seattle.
Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

Christian Sidor is a paleontologist at the Burke Museum in Seattle. In front of him are some 220-million-year-old bones.

They belong to an animal called a Shuvosaurus. This is probably the most complete skeletons of one of these things in the entire world. But it’s still missing a bunch of stuff. Which, in paleontology, is pretty much par for the course.

Let's Eat Cake by Hamed Saber/Flickr

We take a peek inside a fourth generation noodle factory to see how the noodles — and fortune cookies — are made. Then, a visit with one of the original television chefs. Also, an artist finds out that his artwork is edible, at least to ants.

Courtesy Kacie Rahm

When someone eats something that gives them food poisoning, they probably know it when it hits them. It usually comes with stomach cramps, diarrhea and vomiting. The lingering effects can result in a short-term lack of appetite, and perhaps the desire to avoid eating the type of food that made them sick in the first place.

Typically, everything returns to normal after a while. But for Kacie Rahm, her bout with food poisoning had some long-term consequences. In fact, for the better part of a year when she was 11 and 12, she ate hardly anything at all.

FAITH FOUNTAIN

This week, Sound Effect looks back and reflects on storytelling from 2018. The staff shares their favorite stories from the year.

Kirt Edblom/Flickr

This story originally aired Dec. 22, 2017.  

This weekend, many parents will read “The Night Before Christmas” to their children. Well, KNKX has something special for you: a reading of an abridged version of the almost 200 year old poem by many of the voices you hear on the air here at KNKX, and some you don’t normally get to hear on the air. Enjoy.

It’s that time of year where there is no shortage of “best of” lists. The Seattle Times recently published one with the best Seattle music albums of 2018. But unlike most lists featuring the opinion of one person, this one polled music experts from all over the city. KNKX producer Kevin Kniestedt sat down with Michael Rietmulder, who covers music for The Times and curated this list, to talk about the results.

PHILLIP MALE/FLICKR

This show originally aired on January 20, 2018.

Photograph of an illustration from Harper's Weekly, January 6, 1866, p. 8-9. Photographer: Warner, Arthur Churchill, 1864-1943, Negative #70x

This story originally aired on January 20, 2018.   

“Here Come The Brides” was a short-lived television show from the late 1960s. In the show, 1860s Seattle is faced with losing its lumberjacks to other cities because Seattle doesn’t have enough women, until they import a bunch of marriageable ladies from the East Coast, and hilarity ensues.

By Howard Giske, CC BY-SA 3.0

This story originally aired on January 6, 2018.

The first openly-operated gay bar in Seattle was a nightclub called Shelly’s Leg. It was founded in Pioneer Square in 1973 by a woman named Shelly Bauman. It quickly became an important center of LGBT life in Seattle.

But it's the bar's origin story -- and the freak parade accident at the heart of it -- that caught our attention.

This story originally aired on January 6, 2018.  

Everybody loves a good mystery ... some of us more than others. So when Tom DesLongchamp discovered an unusual looking cassette tape in a bargain bin, and discovered a collection of unidentifiable disco songs on one side of it, his curiosity was aroused. That curiosity soon transformed into a fixation, or maybe even an obsession. 

Michael Pollack/Flickr

This show originally aired on January 6, 2018 

In this June 28, 2016 file photo, members of the Rainbow Family of Living Light gather under a tarp at their campsite in Mount Tabor, Vermont.
Wilson Ring / AP file

A woman from a conservative background decides to leave that world and join the Rainbow Family. Then, a woman becomes excommunicated from her family for marrying outside of her religion. Also, a woman reunites with her daycare caretaker, but this time in a completely different type of environment.

Courtesy Mary McIntyre

Mary McIntyre was rasied in Bellevue in a conservative Christian home, and attended a conservative Christian school. There was no shortage of rules and expectations. While Mary loved her family, something was always telling her when she was growing up that this wasn't exactly the life for her.

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We head to Scarecrow Video, where competing against streaming media is a matter of survival. An over-50 women’s champion basketball team finds that losing can be more sweet than winning. Then the story of a man who ran Wyatt Earp out of town, shot the chief of police, and then went straight. Finally, the cutthroat world of pumpkin-growing competitions.

By Thomas R. Conlon - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0

So, just in case you haven’t spent a lot of time in the Seattle of the late 1800s, I can tell you it was a very different city.

Credit Parker Miles Blohm

It's our annual Thanksgiving week tradition, when we share our favorite music stories from the past year. 

KNKX

We meet a woman who combines tap dancing with social justice. A pediatric oncologist shares his story of being pulled out of his comfort zone. And a woman talks about how she chose to shout her diagnosis from the rooftops, only to find out later that she was misdiagnosed.

In her early 20s, Ginny McClure got some bad news. It was the kind of news people tend to be embarrassed to share. Ginny resolved to not be ashamed — to shout it from the rooftops, even.

Still, there are certain subjects you don’t really want to talk about with certain people, like your parents. For Ginny, that subject was sex.

Credit Andrew Skudder/Flickr

KNKX reporter Will James reflects on the closing of the Merkle Hotel, what may be the last remaining low-income residential hotel in Tacoma. Professor Marie Wong gives a history of single room occupancy hotels in the Chinatown International District in Seattle. An elected official talks about how she still uses food banks. We then visit a bicycle-based needle exchange program in Olympia.

Courtesy Marie Wong

Residential hotels once filled a crucial niche for low-income workers and immigrants, a bridge between affordable housing and a shelter.

These Single Room Occupancy hotels, or SROs, used to dominate the streetscape in Seattle’s Chinatown-International District. Now they’re nearly extinct.

It’s a story that caught the attention of Marie Wong, an Associate Professor at Seattle University. It appealed to her background in urban planning, but also to her background as a Chinese American growing up in the Midwest.

(AP Photo/John Froschauer)

There were rumors earlier this week that the Mariners might be looking to strip down their team and trade some of their more talented players during the offseason in an effort to acquire prospects for the future. The first sign that this might be the case came this week, when the M’s traded away catcher Mike Zunino. KNKX sports commentator Art Thiel told producer Kevin Kniestedt that virtually everyone, including closer Edwin Diaz and ace pitcher James Paxton, could be traded for the right price.

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This story originally aired on December 16, 2017.

To say that Washington State University Cougars have school spirit is a wild understatement, and if you have any in your life, you know they don't hesitate to remind you.

Now, Cameron McCoy and many other members of Coug nation have reached a significant milestone in letting their flags fly. 

Actual flags. 

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