Ed Ronco | KNKX

Ed Ronco

All Things Considered Host

Ed Ronco came to KNKX in October 2013 as producer and reporter for KNKX’s Morning Edition. Ed started in public radio in 2009 at KCAW in Sitka, Alaska, where he covered everything from city government, to education, crime, science, the arts and more. Prior to public radio, Ed worked in newspapers, including four years at the South Bend (Ind.) Tribune, where he covered business, then politics and government.

Ed grew up in Wyandotte, Mich., a suburb of Detroit, and earned his bachelor’s degree in journalism from Michigan State University.

Ways to Connect

Faye Fox

Angela Meade thought, when she was growing up in Centralia, that she might be a doctor.

Ed Ronco / KNKX

In Chehalis, just outside of the front door of the Lewis County Historical Museum, you’ll find a giant tree stump tucked under a gazebo, right next to a very busy set of railroad tracks.

This is a replica of the “McKinley Stump,” so named because President William McKinley almost gave a speech from atop it in 1901, during a tour of the Pacific Northwest. Almost.

Elaine Thompson / AP File Photo

Searching for a deal when you travel can be challenging. Many people look to low-cost airlines. They offer lower ticket prices and fewer frills than the big carriers.

But KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley says he recently had two experiences that left him thinking twice about flying on the cheap.

James Melzer / Flickr

Editor's Note: This episode of "Going Places" originally aired on April 28, 2016.

KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley is a big fan of travel experiences that allow for some unexpected discovery. But it's still good to be informed about your destination before you arrive, he says.

Elaine Thompson / AP Photo

This story was updated at 1:40 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11.

A "suicidal" airline mechanic stole an empty Alaska Airlines plane and took off from Sea-Tac International Airport before crashing near a small island Friday night, officials said.

Bert Kaufmann / Flickr/Creative Commons

When you think of jazz festivals in Europe, you probably think about Montreux, in Switzerland.

This week on "Going Places," KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley tells us about a festival in the Netherlands that you probably don't know. It's the Amersfoort Jazz Festival, which seeks to highlight newer talent from around the world, in a small Dutch town that dates back centuries.

Orca whales swimming
The Associated Press

Two orca stories have been prominent in news in recent days: An endangered orca is still clinging to her dead calf more than two weeks after it died. And scientists are considering intervening to help a different young orca, known as J-50, which they fear is sick and near death. 

Pedro Szekely / Flickr/Creative Commons

We're off to London on this week's Going Places. But KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley is not our guide. Instead, he's handing things over this week to his 14-year-old daughter, Aiyana.

She offers her take on what's fun to see and do in London, from the British Museum to the Harry Potter tour.

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Your Tour Guide Does A Lot Of Work You'll Never See

Jul 26, 2018
Earthbound Expeditions

Editor's note: This segment originally aired on June 4, 2015.

If you’ve ever traveled abroad – especially with a group – you’ve probably met up with a local tour guide at your destination.

KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley has been leading tours around the world for nearly 30 years. He says local guides are key experts that bring a lot of knowledge to a trip. But there are other layers of guiding that happen behind the scenes. Here are three things you might not know:

In a lot of countries, it’s a lucrative job.

Matthew Brumley / KNKX

The Montreux Jazz Festival just wrapped up in Switzerland. The diverse lineup included Gregory Porter, Chick Corea, along with Iggy Pop, Jack White, and others.

But music is everywhere at Montreux during the festival – in the performance venues, along the streets, and on the shores of Lake Geneva.

Claude Paris / AP

KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley leads group travel all over the world. It’s not often he finds himself in a country on the day its team wins the World Cup. 

KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley has spent a lot of time in France leading group travel.

He’s driven the roads.

He’s ridden the rails.

But this last trip was aboard a riverboat, cruising down the Seine.

Todd Petit / Flickr

Editor’s note: This segment originally aired July 2, 2015.

You’re looking to get away for a weekend, but the Fourth of July has come and gone, and summer in general kind of crept up on you. KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley says have no fear: There are still plenty of options.

Ed Ronco / KNKX

Community groups and churches are working to find temporary funding for an overnight homeless shelter in Port Angeles after money ran out last week.

Bestpicko.com

Most of us know when we travel to safeguard our personal possessions. You pay attention to where your passport is kept. You might put your money in a discreet pocket or one of those around-the-neck pouches under your shirt.

But experts say it's just as important to safeguard your digital life while traveling.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

 

 

Many people in Seattle -- no matter their political ideology -- are frustrated with their elected leaders, who are trying to keep the business sector happy and confront a growing homelessness crisis.

A Bike Ride Gives You A Slower, Sweeter Perspective

Jun 21, 2018
Steve Walker / Flickr/Creative Commons

On our weekly travel segment “Going Places,” we often talk about ways to slow down while you travel. One way is by seeing your destination from a bicycle, instead of a car or bus.

Lynn DiBenedetto, of Bainbridge Island, has led bike trips domestically and overseas. She spoke with KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley about some of her favorite spots, near and far.

Benjamin Helle / Washington State Archives

Crews have been working inside a warehouse near the Olympia airport every day since a June 9 fire destroyed the Aberdeen Museum of History.

The fire was inside the Aberdeen Armory building, finished in 1921 and gifted to the city in 1981. It housed the museum and other organizations. Much was lost, including exhibits on the upper floors.

amira_a / Flickr/Creative Commons

Chile stretches more than 2,600 miles down the west coast of South America. In that stretch you'll find mountains, a desert, icefields, and vineyards.

Ed Ronco / KNKX

There’s a photo in the hallway of the Port of Port Angeles offices, just down the hall from the office of executive director Karen Goschen. It was taken in the 1980s, from a high angle, looking down at four ships moored at the dock. They’re surrounded by big collections of floating logs.

“It is dramatically different than the number of vessels we have today,” Goschen said.

Cameron Birse / Flickr

Victoria, B.C., is a popular destination for visitors to the Pacific Northwest. From downtown Seattle, many people take the Victoria Clipper to get there via water.

But another good jumping off point for Victoria – and one that will let you bring a car – is Port Angeles. The city on the northern edge of the Olympic Peninsula offers service via the Black Ball Ferry to the capital of British Columbia.

KSQM

About 10 years ago, a new radio station took to the air in Sequim.

KSQM was established in large part to be an emergency broadcaster. Its founder, Rick Perry, felt the area needed some way to receive information quickly in the event of an earthquake, power outage, or other emergency.

Matthew Brumley

It was 74 years ago next week that the Allied forces landed in northern France.

A Trip To Thailand Brings Heat, Food And New Friends

May 24, 2018
Tyson Verse / Earthbound Expeditions

Editor’s note: This segment originally aired Dec. 8, 2016.

Thailand has become a hub of tourism in Southeast Asia. Tyson Verse has traveled there extensively as a tour arranger and guide. 

"There's nothing like a nice evening stroll with a little mix of curry-scented air with exhaust from the tuktuk three-wheeled taxis floating by," he said. "It's magic."

Matthew Brumley

Gregory Porter, Melody Gardot, Dhafer Youssef and Marcus Miller are a few of the names set to perform at this year’s Jazz a Vienne festival in central France.

The festival started in 1981, and has grown significantly. Artistic director Benjamin Tanguy says he wants to bring in new audiences.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

 

Seattle already knew Robinson Cano would be out of the Mariners lineup for several weeks, the result of a broken bone in his right hand. But now his absence will be significantly longer.

 

The All-Star second baseman was suspended for 80 games on Tuesday for violating baseball's drug agreement, becoming among the most prominent players disciplined under the sport's anti-doping rules. Cano tested positive for Furosemide, a diuretic that can be used to mask performance-enhancing drugs.

Roman History, Ancient Passages Greet You In Lyon

May 10, 2018
Matthew Brumley

KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley has been leading tour groups through Europe for more than 20 years. So even he was surprised when he realized he’d never been to Lyon, France. He corrected that, finally, and sent us his first impressions for this week’s Going Places

“I’m not sure what took me so long,” he said. “It’s got world-class wines, some of the best cuisine in all of France, fantastic archeological sites, and these really odd, winding passageways that make their way underneath the city, called traboules.”

Patrick Semansky / AP

Deaths from drug and alcohol use are growing in King County. New numbers from Public Health Seattle & King County show that 379 people died in 2017, up from 348 the year before. That’s a nearly 10 percent increase from last year.

Among the factors driving the increase is the use of heroin and other opioids.

Paula Wissel/KNKX

 

 

In Seattle and King County, homelessness is a state of emergency. The city council is considering a new “head tax” on business to help fund responses to the emergency. But critics say a lot of money has already been spent, without much success.

Nordic Museum CEO Eric Nelson talks to reporters on Tuesday, May 1, ahead of the museum's grand opening. The ribbon cutting is set for May 5.
Ed Ronco / KNKX

The new Nordic Museum is set to open this weekend in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood.

The $50 million building stretches along Market Street in the city’s Ballard neighborhood. It boasts 57,000 square feet of space, including a long “Fjord Hall” that runs the length of the building, separating exhibits about the Nordic countries on one side, and the Nordic experience in America on the other side.

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