earthquake preparedness | KNKX

earthquake preparedness

Construction is underway on the Oregon coast for a new earthquake-hardened marine science building. It will have Oregon's first tsunami vertical evacuation refuge on the roof.

More people than ever—1.2 million in Washington state and more than 570,000 in Oregon—are registered to participate in the annual Great ShakeOut earthquake and tsunami drill Thursday morning.


Not coincidentally, a Washington state agency is using this week to highlight how the Evergreen State needs to play catch up with neighboring states on earthquake preparedness.

Elaine Thompson / AP

A major earthquake-preparedness drill takes place this Saturday in Seattle. It’s called “Hubs and Spokes” and this time, the emphasis is on emergency communications.

AP

This week, some coastal communities in Washington will have the opportunity to better prepare for tsunamis, among other natural disasters. Workshops with Washington State Emergency Management officials are planned for coastal towns that could be at risk if a tsunami strikes.

Parker Miles Blohm / KPLU

Emergency Management offices around the state are analyzing the data collected during last month’s Cascadia Rising earthquake and tsunami drill. They say the four-day exercise did just what it was supposed to: uncover strengths and weaknesses of preparedness plans for a massive earthquake off the West Coast.

Paula Wissel / KPLU

As part of earthquake preparedness, Seattle has identified community hubs where people can gather after a quake. On Saturday, the hubs will be activated for an exercise. But, there are no hubs in some of the city’s most popular neighborhoods, including Belltown, Downtown, the Central District and Capitol Hill.

Imagine being on a rural island when a major earthquake hits off the coast. After five minutes of shaking that registers 9.0 on the Richter scale, devastation is all around. Food, water, medicine and fuel are in short supply.  Along with power and phone service outages, all bridges and ferry connections are down.

KPLU

Do you have an app on your smartphone that sends you a text message reminding you to exercise? Or one that alerts you when the bus is going to be late? The federal government is also using this sort of push technology to help prepare you for disaster.